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The control of specificity in guard cell signal transduction.

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The control of specificity in guard cell signal transduction. / Hetherington, Alistair M.; Gray, J. E.; Leckie, C.; McAinsh, Martin R.; Ng, C.; Pical, C.; Priestly, A. J.; Staxén, I.; Webb, A. A. R.

In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 353, No. 1374, 09.1998, p. 1489-1494.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Hetherington, AM, Gray, JE, Leckie, C, McAinsh, MR, Ng, C, Pical, C, Priestly, AJ, Staxén, I & Webb, AAR 1998, 'The control of specificity in guard cell signal transduction.', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 353, no. 1374, pp. 1489-1494. https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.1998.0304

APA

Hetherington, A. M., Gray, J. E., Leckie, C., McAinsh, M. R., Ng, C., Pical, C., Priestly, A. J., Staxén, I., & Webb, A. A. R. (1998). The control of specificity in guard cell signal transduction. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 353(1374), 1489-1494. https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.1998.0304

Vancouver

Hetherington AM, Gray JE, Leckie C, McAinsh MR, Ng C, Pical C et al. The control of specificity in guard cell signal transduction. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 1998 Sep;353(1374):1489-1494. https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.1998.0304

Author

Hetherington, Alistair M. ; Gray, J. E. ; Leckie, C. ; McAinsh, Martin R. ; Ng, C. ; Pical, C. ; Priestly, A. J. ; Staxén, I. ; Webb, A. A. R. / The control of specificity in guard cell signal transduction. In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 1998 ; Vol. 353, No. 1374. pp. 1489-1494.

Bibtex

@article{dd5c5f85ba7c47a0a58702b46d8bfdbb,
title = "The control of specificity in guard cell signal transduction.",
abstract = "Stomatal guard cells have proven to be an attractive system for dissecting the mechanisms of stimulus–response coupling in plants. In this review we focus on the intracellular signal transduction pathways by which extracellular signals bring about closure and opening of the stomatal pore. It is proposed that guard cell signal transduction pathways may be organized into functional arrays or signalling cassettes that contain elements common to a number of converging signalling pathways. The purpose of these signalling cassettes may be to funnel extracellular signals down onto the ion transporters that control the fluxes of ions that underlie stomatal movements. Evidence is emerging that specificity in guard cell signalling may be, in part, encoded in complex spatio–temporal patterns of increases in the concentration of cytosolic–free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt). It is suggested that oscillations in [Ca2+]cyt may generate calcium signatures that encode information concerning the stimulus type and strength. New evidence is presented that suggests that these calcium signatures may integrate information when many stimuli are present.",
keywords = "stomata, calcium, signalling cassette, guard cell, signal transduction, abscisic acid",
author = "Hetherington, {Alistair M.} and Gray, {J. E.} and C. Leckie and McAinsh, {Martin R.} and C. Ng and C. Pical and Priestly, {A. J.} and I. Stax{\'e}n and Webb, {A. A. R.}",
year = "1998",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1098/rstb.1998.0304",
language = "English",
volume = "353",
pages = "1489--1494",
journal = "Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8436",
publisher = "Royal Society",
number = "1374",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The control of specificity in guard cell signal transduction.

AU - Hetherington, Alistair M.

AU - Gray, J. E.

AU - Leckie, C.

AU - McAinsh, Martin R.

AU - Ng, C.

AU - Pical, C.

AU - Priestly, A. J.

AU - Staxén, I.

AU - Webb, A. A. R.

PY - 1998/9

Y1 - 1998/9

N2 - Stomatal guard cells have proven to be an attractive system for dissecting the mechanisms of stimulus–response coupling in plants. In this review we focus on the intracellular signal transduction pathways by which extracellular signals bring about closure and opening of the stomatal pore. It is proposed that guard cell signal transduction pathways may be organized into functional arrays or signalling cassettes that contain elements common to a number of converging signalling pathways. The purpose of these signalling cassettes may be to funnel extracellular signals down onto the ion transporters that control the fluxes of ions that underlie stomatal movements. Evidence is emerging that specificity in guard cell signalling may be, in part, encoded in complex spatio–temporal patterns of increases in the concentration of cytosolic–free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt). It is suggested that oscillations in [Ca2+]cyt may generate calcium signatures that encode information concerning the stimulus type and strength. New evidence is presented that suggests that these calcium signatures may integrate information when many stimuli are present.

AB - Stomatal guard cells have proven to be an attractive system for dissecting the mechanisms of stimulus–response coupling in plants. In this review we focus on the intracellular signal transduction pathways by which extracellular signals bring about closure and opening of the stomatal pore. It is proposed that guard cell signal transduction pathways may be organized into functional arrays or signalling cassettes that contain elements common to a number of converging signalling pathways. The purpose of these signalling cassettes may be to funnel extracellular signals down onto the ion transporters that control the fluxes of ions that underlie stomatal movements. Evidence is emerging that specificity in guard cell signalling may be, in part, encoded in complex spatio–temporal patterns of increases in the concentration of cytosolic–free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt). It is suggested that oscillations in [Ca2+]cyt may generate calcium signatures that encode information concerning the stimulus type and strength. New evidence is presented that suggests that these calcium signatures may integrate information when many stimuli are present.

KW - stomata

KW - calcium

KW - signalling cassette

KW - guard cell

KW - signal transduction

KW - abscisic acid

U2 - 10.1098/rstb.1998.0304

DO - 10.1098/rstb.1998.0304

M3 - Journal article

VL - 353

SP - 1489

EP - 1494

JO - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

JF - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8436

IS - 1374

ER -