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The design and function of birds' nests

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The design and function of birds' nests. / Mainwaring, Mark C.; Hartley, Ian R.; Lambrechts, Marcel M.; Deeming, D. Charles.

In: Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 4, No. 20, 11.2014, p. 3909-3928.

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

Harvard

Mainwaring, MC, Hartley, IR, Lambrechts, MM & Deeming, DC 2014, 'The design and function of birds' nests', Ecology and Evolution, vol. 4, no. 20, pp. 3909-3928. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1054

APA

Mainwaring, M. C., Hartley, I. R., Lambrechts, M. M., & Deeming, D. C. (2014). The design and function of birds' nests. Ecology and Evolution, 4(20), 3909-3928. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1054

Vancouver

Mainwaring MC, Hartley IR, Lambrechts MM, Deeming DC. The design and function of birds' nests. Ecology and Evolution. 2014 Nov;4(20):3909-3928. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1054

Author

Mainwaring, Mark C. ; Hartley, Ian R. ; Lambrechts, Marcel M. ; Deeming, D. Charles. / The design and function of birds' nests. In: Ecology and Evolution. 2014 ; Vol. 4, No. 20. pp. 3909-3928.

Bibtex

@article{1c4eca392f7b4bda93ddaa7ebf61775d,
title = "The design and function of birds' nests",
abstract = "All birds construct nests in which to lay eggs and/or raise offspring. Traditionally, it was thought that natural selection and the requirement to minimize the risk of predation determined the design of completed nests. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that sexual selection also influences nest design. This is an important development as while species such as bowerbirds build structures that are extended phenotypic signals whose sole purpose is to attract a mate, nests contain eggs and/or offspring, thereby suggesting a direct trade-off between the conflicting requirements of natural and sexual selection. Nest design also varies adaptively in order to both minimize the detrimental effects of parasites and to create a suitable microclimate for parents and developing offspring in relation to predictable variation in environmental conditions. Our understanding of the design and function of birds' nests has increased considerably in recent years, and the evidence suggests that nests have four nonmutually exclusive functions. Consequently, we conclude that the design of birds' nests is far more sophisticated than previously realized and that nests are multifunctional structures that have important fitness consequences for the builder/s.",
keywords = "Architecture, behavior, environmental adjustment, evolution, host-parasite coevolution, natural selection, nest, sexual selection, SWALLOWS TACHYCINETA-BICOLOR, TITS CYANISTES-CAERULEUS, GREEN PLANT-MATERIAL, FEMALE SPOTLESS STARLINGS, WEAVER PHILETAIRUS-SOCIUS, MALE MARSH WRENS, BLUE TIT, SITE SELECTION, TREE SWALLOWS, MATE-CHOICE",
author = "Mainwaring, {Mark C.} and Hartley, {Ian R.} and Lambrechts, {Marcel M.} and Deeming, {D. Charles}",
year = "2014",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1002/ece3.1054",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "3909--3928",
journal = "Ecology and Evolution",
issn = "2045-7758",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "20",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The design and function of birds' nests

AU - Mainwaring, Mark C.

AU - Hartley, Ian R.

AU - Lambrechts, Marcel M.

AU - Deeming, D. Charles

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - All birds construct nests in which to lay eggs and/or raise offspring. Traditionally, it was thought that natural selection and the requirement to minimize the risk of predation determined the design of completed nests. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that sexual selection also influences nest design. This is an important development as while species such as bowerbirds build structures that are extended phenotypic signals whose sole purpose is to attract a mate, nests contain eggs and/or offspring, thereby suggesting a direct trade-off between the conflicting requirements of natural and sexual selection. Nest design also varies adaptively in order to both minimize the detrimental effects of parasites and to create a suitable microclimate for parents and developing offspring in relation to predictable variation in environmental conditions. Our understanding of the design and function of birds' nests has increased considerably in recent years, and the evidence suggests that nests have four nonmutually exclusive functions. Consequently, we conclude that the design of birds' nests is far more sophisticated than previously realized and that nests are multifunctional structures that have important fitness consequences for the builder/s.

AB - All birds construct nests in which to lay eggs and/or raise offspring. Traditionally, it was thought that natural selection and the requirement to minimize the risk of predation determined the design of completed nests. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that sexual selection also influences nest design. This is an important development as while species such as bowerbirds build structures that are extended phenotypic signals whose sole purpose is to attract a mate, nests contain eggs and/or offspring, thereby suggesting a direct trade-off between the conflicting requirements of natural and sexual selection. Nest design also varies adaptively in order to both minimize the detrimental effects of parasites and to create a suitable microclimate for parents and developing offspring in relation to predictable variation in environmental conditions. Our understanding of the design and function of birds' nests has increased considerably in recent years, and the evidence suggests that nests have four nonmutually exclusive functions. Consequently, we conclude that the design of birds' nests is far more sophisticated than previously realized and that nests are multifunctional structures that have important fitness consequences for the builder/s.

KW - Architecture

KW - behavior

KW - environmental adjustment

KW - evolution

KW - host-parasite coevolution

KW - natural selection

KW - nest

KW - sexual selection

KW - SWALLOWS TACHYCINETA-BICOLOR

KW - TITS CYANISTES-CAERULEUS

KW - GREEN PLANT-MATERIAL

KW - FEMALE SPOTLESS STARLINGS

KW - WEAVER PHILETAIRUS-SOCIUS

KW - MALE MARSH WRENS

KW - BLUE TIT

KW - SITE SELECTION

KW - TREE SWALLOWS

KW - MATE-CHOICE

U2 - 10.1002/ece3.1054

DO - 10.1002/ece3.1054

M3 - Literature review

VL - 4

SP - 3909

EP - 3928

JO - Ecology and Evolution

JF - Ecology and Evolution

SN - 2045-7758

IS - 20

ER -