Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > The ecological outcomes of collaborative govern...

Electronic data

  • Accepted Author Manuscript_JEMA

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Environmental Management . Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Environmental Management, 281, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2020.111836

    Accepted author manuscript, 8.65 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 9/01/22

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

The ecological outcomes of collaborative governance in large river basins: Who is in the room and does it matter?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
Article number111836
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/03/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Environmental Management
Volume281
Number of pages12
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date9/01/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Although collaborative governance has been presented as central in environmental management, it does not guarantee sustainable natural resources management. Due to methodological challenges and a lack of robust interdisciplinary data, few studies have linked collaborative processes to ecological outcomes. This paper contributes to that research effort by investigating whether the relative involvement of different interest groups in deliberations matters from an ecological perspective. To that end, this interdisciplinary paper links social and ecological indicators across two large French river basins in a dataset spanning 25 years. We find that the presence of different interest groups - agricultural, industrial and NGOs - during deliberations, is linked to different ecological outcomes. Most notably, the composition of present members does not play the same role depending on the type of pollution source studied (e.g. point and/or diffuse sources).

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Environmental Management . Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Environmental Management, 281, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2020.111836