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    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Lord AJ, Field S, Smith IC. The experiences of staff who support people with intellectual disability on issues about death, dying and bereavement: A metasynthesis. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2017;30:1007–1021. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12376 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12376/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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The Experiences of Staff Who Support People with Intellectual Disability on Issues About Death, Dying, and Bereavement: a metasynthesis

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The Experiences of Staff Who Support People with Intellectual Disability on Issues About Death, Dying, and Bereavement : a metasynthesis. / Lord, Ailsa; Field, Stephen John; Smith, Ian Craig.

In: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 30, No. 6, 11.2017, p. 1007-1021.

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@article{5a7ea8998a854d109e6b4e8b66482fbd,
title = "The Experiences of Staff Who Support People with Intellectual Disability on Issues About Death, Dying, and Bereavement: a metasynthesis",
abstract = "Background: Historically, people with intellectual disabilities have tended to be excludedfrom knowing about death, dying, and bereavement. Staff in intellectual disability servicescan play a valuable role in improving understanding of these issues in those they support.This qualitative metasynthesis aimed to understand the experiences of staff supporting adultswith intellectual disabilities with issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Method: Thirteen papers were identified following a systematic review of six databases. Results: Three themes were developed following a lines-of-argument synthesis: (1) Talking about death is hard: Negotiating the uncertainty in death, dying, and bereavement; (2) The commitment topromoting a “good death”; and (3) The grief behind the professional mask. “A cautious silence: The taboo of death,” was an overarching theme. Conclusions: A more open culture around issues of death, dying, and bereavement in intellectual disability settings is essential and could be promoted through staff training and support.",
author = "Ailsa Lord and Field, {Stephen John} and Smith, {Ian Craig}",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Lord AJ, Field S, Smith IC. The experiences of staff who support people with intellectual disability on issues about death, dying and bereavement: A metasynthesis. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2017;30:1007–1021. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12376 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12376/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.",
year = "2017",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1111/jar.12376",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "1007--1021",
journal = "Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities",
issn = "1360-2322",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Experiences of Staff Who Support People with Intellectual Disability on Issues About Death, Dying, and Bereavement

T2 - a metasynthesis

AU - Lord, Ailsa

AU - Field, Stephen John

AU - Smith, Ian Craig

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Lord AJ, Field S, Smith IC. The experiences of staff who support people with intellectual disability on issues about death, dying and bereavement: A metasynthesis. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2017;30:1007–1021. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12376 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12376/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

PY - 2017/11

Y1 - 2017/11

N2 - Background: Historically, people with intellectual disabilities have tended to be excludedfrom knowing about death, dying, and bereavement. Staff in intellectual disability servicescan play a valuable role in improving understanding of these issues in those they support.This qualitative metasynthesis aimed to understand the experiences of staff supporting adultswith intellectual disabilities with issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Method: Thirteen papers were identified following a systematic review of six databases. Results: Three themes were developed following a lines-of-argument synthesis: (1) Talking about death is hard: Negotiating the uncertainty in death, dying, and bereavement; (2) The commitment topromoting a “good death”; and (3) The grief behind the professional mask. “A cautious silence: The taboo of death,” was an overarching theme. Conclusions: A more open culture around issues of death, dying, and bereavement in intellectual disability settings is essential and could be promoted through staff training and support.

AB - Background: Historically, people with intellectual disabilities have tended to be excludedfrom knowing about death, dying, and bereavement. Staff in intellectual disability servicescan play a valuable role in improving understanding of these issues in those they support.This qualitative metasynthesis aimed to understand the experiences of staff supporting adultswith intellectual disabilities with issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Method: Thirteen papers were identified following a systematic review of six databases. Results: Three themes were developed following a lines-of-argument synthesis: (1) Talking about death is hard: Negotiating the uncertainty in death, dying, and bereavement; (2) The commitment topromoting a “good death”; and (3) The grief behind the professional mask. “A cautious silence: The taboo of death,” was an overarching theme. Conclusions: A more open culture around issues of death, dying, and bereavement in intellectual disability settings is essential and could be promoted through staff training and support.

U2 - 10.1111/jar.12376

DO - 10.1111/jar.12376

M3 - Journal article

VL - 30

SP - 1007

EP - 1021

JO - Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

JF - Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

SN - 1360-2322

IS - 6

ER -