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The experiences of therapists providing psychological treatment for adults with depression and intellectual disabilities as part of a randomised controlled trial

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The experiences of therapists providing psychological treatment for adults with depression and intellectual disabilities as part of a randomised controlled trial. / Smith, Ian; Huws, Jaci; Appleton, Kim; Cooper, Sally-Ann; Dagnan, Dave; Hastings, Richard; Hatton, Chris; Jones, Robert ; Melville, Craig; Scott, Katie; Williams, Chris; Jahoda, A .

In: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 34, No. 6, 30.11.2021, p. 1442-1451.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Smith, I, Huws, J, Appleton, K, Cooper, S-A, Dagnan, D, Hastings, R, Hatton, C, Jones, R, Melville, C, Scott, K, Williams, C & Jahoda, A 2021, 'The experiences of therapists providing psychological treatment for adults with depression and intellectual disabilities as part of a randomised controlled trial', Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 1442-1451. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12886

APA

Smith, I., Huws, J., Appleton, K., Cooper, S-A., Dagnan, D., Hastings, R., Hatton, C., Jones, R., Melville, C., Scott, K., Williams, C., & Jahoda, A. (2021). The experiences of therapists providing psychological treatment for adults with depression and intellectual disabilities as part of a randomised controlled trial. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 34(6), 1442-1451. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12886

Vancouver

Smith I, Huws J, Appleton K, Cooper S-A, Dagnan D, Hastings R et al. The experiences of therapists providing psychological treatment for adults with depression and intellectual disabilities as part of a randomised controlled trial. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities. 2021 Nov 30;34(6):1442-1451. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12886

Author

Smith, Ian ; Huws, Jaci ; Appleton, Kim ; Cooper, Sally-Ann ; Dagnan, Dave ; Hastings, Richard ; Hatton, Chris ; Jones, Robert ; Melville, Craig ; Scott, Katie ; Williams, Chris ; Jahoda, A . / The experiences of therapists providing psychological treatment for adults with depression and intellectual disabilities as part of a randomised controlled trial. In: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities. 2021 ; Vol. 34, No. 6. pp. 1442-1451.

Bibtex

@article{3a4ca3fa5ca4488f84fabf03ea281124,
title = "The experiences of therapists providing psychological treatment for adults with depression and intellectual disabilities as part of a randomised controlled trial",
abstract = "Background: Health professionals were trained to deliver adapted psychological interventions for depression to people with learning disabilities and depression alongside a supporter. Exploring the delivery of psychological interventions can help increase access to therapy.Method: Twenty-seven participants took part in six focus groups, and the data were subject to a Framework Analysis.Results: The structure and focus of the manualised therapies, and the use of specific techniques were perceived as key to service-user engagement. Supporters' involvement was valued by therapists if they had a good relationship and regular contact with the individual they supported. Regular clinical supervision was regarded as vital in understanding their role, assessing progress and delivering the interventions.Conclusions: The findings highlight that health professionals can embrace a focussed therapeutic role and increase access to psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities.",
keywords = "behavioural activation, depression, guided self‐help, intellectual disability, psychological therapy, psychological therapy training, supervision, therapist",
author = "Ian Smith and Jaci Huws and Kim Appleton and Sally-Ann Cooper and Dave Dagnan and Richard Hastings and Chris Hatton and Robert Jones and Craig Melville and Katie Scott and Chris Williams and A Jahoda",
year = "2021",
month = nov,
day = "30",
doi = "10.1111/jar.12886",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "1442--1451",
journal = "Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities",
issn = "1360-2322",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The experiences of therapists providing psychological treatment for adults with depression and intellectual disabilities as part of a randomised controlled trial

AU - Smith, Ian

AU - Huws, Jaci

AU - Appleton, Kim

AU - Cooper, Sally-Ann

AU - Dagnan, Dave

AU - Hastings, Richard

AU - Hatton, Chris

AU - Jones, Robert

AU - Melville, Craig

AU - Scott, Katie

AU - Williams, Chris

AU - Jahoda, A

PY - 2021/11/30

Y1 - 2021/11/30

N2 - Background: Health professionals were trained to deliver adapted psychological interventions for depression to people with learning disabilities and depression alongside a supporter. Exploring the delivery of psychological interventions can help increase access to therapy.Method: Twenty-seven participants took part in six focus groups, and the data were subject to a Framework Analysis.Results: The structure and focus of the manualised therapies, and the use of specific techniques were perceived as key to service-user engagement. Supporters' involvement was valued by therapists if they had a good relationship and regular contact with the individual they supported. Regular clinical supervision was regarded as vital in understanding their role, assessing progress and delivering the interventions.Conclusions: The findings highlight that health professionals can embrace a focussed therapeutic role and increase access to psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities.

AB - Background: Health professionals were trained to deliver adapted psychological interventions for depression to people with learning disabilities and depression alongside a supporter. Exploring the delivery of psychological interventions can help increase access to therapy.Method: Twenty-seven participants took part in six focus groups, and the data were subject to a Framework Analysis.Results: The structure and focus of the manualised therapies, and the use of specific techniques were perceived as key to service-user engagement. Supporters' involvement was valued by therapists if they had a good relationship and regular contact with the individual they supported. Regular clinical supervision was regarded as vital in understanding their role, assessing progress and delivering the interventions.Conclusions: The findings highlight that health professionals can embrace a focussed therapeutic role and increase access to psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities.

KW - behavioural activation

KW - depression

KW - guided self‐help

KW - intellectual disability

KW - psychological therapy

KW - psychological therapy training

KW - supervision

KW - therapist

U2 - 10.1111/jar.12886

DO - 10.1111/jar.12886

M3 - Journal article

VL - 34

SP - 1442

EP - 1451

JO - Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

JF - Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

SN - 1360-2322

IS - 6

ER -