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The Ideology Factor and Individual Disengagements from the Muslim Brotherhood

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The Ideology Factor and Individual Disengagements from the Muslim Brotherhood. / Menshawy, Mustafa .

In: Religions, Vol. 12, No. 3, 198, 17.03.2021.

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Menshawy M. The Ideology Factor and Individual Disengagements from the Muslim Brotherhood. Religions. 2021 Mar 17;12(3):198. doi: 10.3390/rel12030198

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@article{d66547bd6ff9483f951d726650f38d3d,
title = "The Ideology Factor and Individual Disengagements from the Muslim Brotherhood",
abstract = "Since 2011, there has been a growing wave of individuals leaving Egypt{\textquoteright}s Muslim Brotherhood, and many of them have opted for documented publicity by writing autobiographies narrating their whole journey. This article explores the ideological components of the disengagement process on the basis of a frame analysis of these writings. It seeks to understand how individuals acted against some of the meanings central to the Brotherhood{\textquoteright}s ideological character and influence. They construct sets of meanings negating or renegotiating those long fixated, sanctified and ineluctable parts of the group{\textquoteright}s ideology. The process of meaning making is situated within the Arab Spring where the Brotherhood{\textquoteright}s dominant ideology also suffered from ruptures, incongruence or dissonance. For example, many exiters realized that the group{\textquoteright}s ideology is not {\textquoteleft}evolutionary{\textquoteright} enough to align with a {\textquoteleft}revolutionary{\textquoteright} moment in Egypt{\textquoteright}s history, and it thus failed to provide them with a sense of meaning regarding the dramatically changing world around them. The disillusionment goes beyond a battle of textually-situated meanings between the Brotherhood and its disgruntled members during the process of their departure from it. It appertains to a context of new resources and opportunities made available to exiters to resist, challenge, and even falsify the dominant ideology without incurring heavy losses or harsh penalties often meted out by the group against its {\textquoteleft}dissidents{\textquoteright}. The agency of exiters, i.e., their capacity to act against the group{\textquoteright}s ideology or manifest their rebellion against its elements, is also enabled by the state{\textquoteright}s relative tolerance towards the exiters, a degree of social assimilation inside Egypt, internal ideological and organizational divisions inside the Brotherhood and geographical re-spatialization",
keywords = "Political Islam, Egypt, Ideology and Society, Politics, Middle East, Arab Spring",
author = "Mustafa Menshawy",
year = "2021",
month = mar,
day = "17",
doi = "10.3390/rel12030198",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "Religions",
issn = "2077-1444",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Ideology Factor and Individual Disengagements from the Muslim Brotherhood

AU - Menshawy, Mustafa

PY - 2021/3/17

Y1 - 2021/3/17

N2 - Since 2011, there has been a growing wave of individuals leaving Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, and many of them have opted for documented publicity by writing autobiographies narrating their whole journey. This article explores the ideological components of the disengagement process on the basis of a frame analysis of these writings. It seeks to understand how individuals acted against some of the meanings central to the Brotherhood’s ideological character and influence. They construct sets of meanings negating or renegotiating those long fixated, sanctified and ineluctable parts of the group’s ideology. The process of meaning making is situated within the Arab Spring where the Brotherhood’s dominant ideology also suffered from ruptures, incongruence or dissonance. For example, many exiters realized that the group’s ideology is not ‘evolutionary’ enough to align with a ‘revolutionary’ moment in Egypt’s history, and it thus failed to provide them with a sense of meaning regarding the dramatically changing world around them. The disillusionment goes beyond a battle of textually-situated meanings between the Brotherhood and its disgruntled members during the process of their departure from it. It appertains to a context of new resources and opportunities made available to exiters to resist, challenge, and even falsify the dominant ideology without incurring heavy losses or harsh penalties often meted out by the group against its ‘dissidents’. The agency of exiters, i.e., their capacity to act against the group’s ideology or manifest their rebellion against its elements, is also enabled by the state’s relative tolerance towards the exiters, a degree of social assimilation inside Egypt, internal ideological and organizational divisions inside the Brotherhood and geographical re-spatialization

AB - Since 2011, there has been a growing wave of individuals leaving Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, and many of them have opted for documented publicity by writing autobiographies narrating their whole journey. This article explores the ideological components of the disengagement process on the basis of a frame analysis of these writings. It seeks to understand how individuals acted against some of the meanings central to the Brotherhood’s ideological character and influence. They construct sets of meanings negating or renegotiating those long fixated, sanctified and ineluctable parts of the group’s ideology. The process of meaning making is situated within the Arab Spring where the Brotherhood’s dominant ideology also suffered from ruptures, incongruence or dissonance. For example, many exiters realized that the group’s ideology is not ‘evolutionary’ enough to align with a ‘revolutionary’ moment in Egypt’s history, and it thus failed to provide them with a sense of meaning regarding the dramatically changing world around them. The disillusionment goes beyond a battle of textually-situated meanings between the Brotherhood and its disgruntled members during the process of their departure from it. It appertains to a context of new resources and opportunities made available to exiters to resist, challenge, and even falsify the dominant ideology without incurring heavy losses or harsh penalties often meted out by the group against its ‘dissidents’. The agency of exiters, i.e., their capacity to act against the group’s ideology or manifest their rebellion against its elements, is also enabled by the state’s relative tolerance towards the exiters, a degree of social assimilation inside Egypt, internal ideological and organizational divisions inside the Brotherhood and geographical re-spatialization

KW - Political Islam

KW - Egypt

KW - Ideology and Society

KW - Politics

KW - Middle East

KW - Arab Spring

U2 - 10.3390/rel12030198

DO - 10.3390/rel12030198

M3 - Journal article

VL - 12

JO - Religions

JF - Religions

SN - 2077-1444

IS - 3

M1 - 198

ER -