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The (in)accuracies of floating leaves: how people with varying experiences of dementia differently position the same visual metaphor

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The (in)accuracies of floating leaves : how people with varying experiences of dementia differently position the same visual metaphor. / Putland, Emma.

In: Dementia, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.07.2022, p. 1471-1487.

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@article{f70cf20897e243cd9fb26581c684652c,
title = "The (in)accuracies of floating leaves: how people with varying experiences of dementia differently position the same visual metaphor",
abstract = "Metaphors help shape the social world. Yet, with research and language guidelines focusing primarily on the stigmatising potential of verbal representations, much greater attention is needed regarding visual metaphors{\textquoteright} role in perpetuating and challenging particular views of dementia. Through semi-structured interviews and focus groups, this paper explores how people with dementia and their carers and/or loved ones evaluate one prevalent visual metaphor for dementia that maps autumnal trees losing leaves onto the brain/head. Analysis considers three main responses to the metaphor, that: (1) it does not depict dementia; (2) it meaningfully explains a biomedical account of progressive brain deterioration; and (3) it reinforces inaccurate and/or {\textquoteleft}hopeless{\textquoteright} discourses of what having dementia involves, with individuals suggesting creative alterations to better fit their counter discourses. These findings foreground the importance of attending to subjectivity, nuance and multi-layered discourses within visual metaphors, which can indirectly convey stigmatising representations.",
keywords = "dementia, metaphor, visual, brain, thematic, discourse analysis, focus groups, interviews",
author = "Emma Putland",
year = "2022",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/14713012211072507",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "1471--1487",
journal = "Dementia",
issn = "1471-3012",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The (in)accuracies of floating leaves

T2 - how people with varying experiences of dementia differently position the same visual metaphor

AU - Putland, Emma

PY - 2022/7/1

Y1 - 2022/7/1

N2 - Metaphors help shape the social world. Yet, with research and language guidelines focusing primarily on the stigmatising potential of verbal representations, much greater attention is needed regarding visual metaphors’ role in perpetuating and challenging particular views of dementia. Through semi-structured interviews and focus groups, this paper explores how people with dementia and their carers and/or loved ones evaluate one prevalent visual metaphor for dementia that maps autumnal trees losing leaves onto the brain/head. Analysis considers three main responses to the metaphor, that: (1) it does not depict dementia; (2) it meaningfully explains a biomedical account of progressive brain deterioration; and (3) it reinforces inaccurate and/or ‘hopeless’ discourses of what having dementia involves, with individuals suggesting creative alterations to better fit their counter discourses. These findings foreground the importance of attending to subjectivity, nuance and multi-layered discourses within visual metaphors, which can indirectly convey stigmatising representations.

AB - Metaphors help shape the social world. Yet, with research and language guidelines focusing primarily on the stigmatising potential of verbal representations, much greater attention is needed regarding visual metaphors’ role in perpetuating and challenging particular views of dementia. Through semi-structured interviews and focus groups, this paper explores how people with dementia and their carers and/or loved ones evaluate one prevalent visual metaphor for dementia that maps autumnal trees losing leaves onto the brain/head. Analysis considers three main responses to the metaphor, that: (1) it does not depict dementia; (2) it meaningfully explains a biomedical account of progressive brain deterioration; and (3) it reinforces inaccurate and/or ‘hopeless’ discourses of what having dementia involves, with individuals suggesting creative alterations to better fit their counter discourses. These findings foreground the importance of attending to subjectivity, nuance and multi-layered discourses within visual metaphors, which can indirectly convey stigmatising representations.

KW - dementia

KW - metaphor

KW - visual

KW - brain

KW - thematic

KW - discourse analysis

KW - focus groups

KW - interviews

U2 - 10.1177/14713012211072507

DO - 10.1177/14713012211072507

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 35148618

VL - 21

SP - 1471

EP - 1487

JO - Dementia

JF - Dementia

SN - 1471-3012

IS - 5

ER -