Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > The labour supply effect of a partial cash-out ...

Electronic data

  • 2193-8997-2-1

    Rights statement: © 2013 Bingley and Walker; licensee Springer. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

    Final published version, 502 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

The labour supply effect of a partial cash-out of in-kind transfers to single mothers

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>28/02/2013
<mark>Journal</mark>IZA Journal of Labor Economics
Issue number1
Volume2
Number of pages27
Publication StatusPublished
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

We estimate a model of labour supply and participation in multiple cash and in-kind welfare programmes. The modeling exploits a reform that affected U.K. single mothers. In-work cash entitlements increased under this reform but eligibility to in-kind child nutrition programmes was lost for some households. When we allow for differences in the costs associated with each welfare programme we find that in-work cash and in-work in-kind transfers both have large positive labour supply effects. There is, however, a utility loss from programme participation which is estimated to be larger for the cash programme than for the child nutrition programmes. Our findings imply that the partial cash out of the in-kind transfers reduced labour supply and suggest that there may be a place in policy portfolios for in-kind programmes despite their “inefficiency”.

Bibliographic note

© 2013 Bingley and Walker; licensee Springer. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.