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    Rights statement: This article has been published in Metaphor and the Social World, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2017, pages: 5-25, © 2017 John Benjamins, the publisher should be contacted for permission to re-use the material in any form.

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The light within: metaphor consistency in Quaker pamphlets, 1659-2010

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The light within : metaphor consistency in Quaker pamphlets, 1659-2010. / Koller, Veronika.

In: Metaphor and the Social World, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2017, p. 5-25.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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Koller, Veronika. / The light within : metaphor consistency in Quaker pamphlets, 1659-2010. In: Metaphor and the Social World. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 5-25.

Bibtex

@article{d60a322d58a442b189b76714f63ab8b2,
title = "The light within: metaphor consistency in Quaker pamphlets, 1659-2010",
abstract = "This paper contributes to the study of religious metaphor by combining discourse analysis with cognitive semantics. In particular, it engages in a diachronic study of 30 pamphlets written by British Quakers and addressed to the general public to investigate the consistency of metaphor use in that genre across three and a half centuries. Consistency is seen as metaphors recording the same source domains and/or scenarios and/or lexical realisations across time, with maximum consistency meeting all three criteria. . Utilising the notions of genre and discourse community along with metaphor domains and scenarios, the analysis shows that among 19 metaphor domains that occur in texts from at least two different centuries, just under 60 per cent are highly or maximally consistent, with domains of maximum consistency being the largest group. The changing purposes of the pamphlet genre and the evolving social and historical and contexts do not diminish this long-term metaphor consistency.This overall finding is explained with recourse to the dual-processing/representation theory of religious cognition, which posits a difference between theological and basic everyday representations and processing of God concepts. Quakerism shows an overall lack of an abstract theology, with Quakers instead establishing various metaphors for God to express their lived experience of the divine. The remarkable consistency of metaphors in Quaker pamphlets suggests that Quakerism makes God concepts intuitively meaningful and relevant.",
author = "Veronika Koller",
note = "This article has been published in Metaphor and the Social World, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2017, pages: 5-25, {\textcopyright} 2017 John Benjamins, the publisher should be contacted for permission to re-use the material in any form.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1075/msw.7.1.02kol",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "5--25",
journal = "Metaphor and the Social World",
issn = "2210-4070",
publisher = "John Benjamins Publishing Company",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The light within

T2 - metaphor consistency in Quaker pamphlets, 1659-2010

AU - Koller, Veronika

N1 - This article has been published in Metaphor and the Social World, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2017, pages: 5-25, © 2017 John Benjamins, the publisher should be contacted for permission to re-use the material in any form.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - This paper contributes to the study of religious metaphor by combining discourse analysis with cognitive semantics. In particular, it engages in a diachronic study of 30 pamphlets written by British Quakers and addressed to the general public to investigate the consistency of metaphor use in that genre across three and a half centuries. Consistency is seen as metaphors recording the same source domains and/or scenarios and/or lexical realisations across time, with maximum consistency meeting all three criteria. . Utilising the notions of genre and discourse community along with metaphor domains and scenarios, the analysis shows that among 19 metaphor domains that occur in texts from at least two different centuries, just under 60 per cent are highly or maximally consistent, with domains of maximum consistency being the largest group. The changing purposes of the pamphlet genre and the evolving social and historical and contexts do not diminish this long-term metaphor consistency.This overall finding is explained with recourse to the dual-processing/representation theory of religious cognition, which posits a difference between theological and basic everyday representations and processing of God concepts. Quakerism shows an overall lack of an abstract theology, with Quakers instead establishing various metaphors for God to express their lived experience of the divine. The remarkable consistency of metaphors in Quaker pamphlets suggests that Quakerism makes God concepts intuitively meaningful and relevant.

AB - This paper contributes to the study of religious metaphor by combining discourse analysis with cognitive semantics. In particular, it engages in a diachronic study of 30 pamphlets written by British Quakers and addressed to the general public to investigate the consistency of metaphor use in that genre across three and a half centuries. Consistency is seen as metaphors recording the same source domains and/or scenarios and/or lexical realisations across time, with maximum consistency meeting all three criteria. . Utilising the notions of genre and discourse community along with metaphor domains and scenarios, the analysis shows that among 19 metaphor domains that occur in texts from at least two different centuries, just under 60 per cent are highly or maximally consistent, with domains of maximum consistency being the largest group. The changing purposes of the pamphlet genre and the evolving social and historical and contexts do not diminish this long-term metaphor consistency.This overall finding is explained with recourse to the dual-processing/representation theory of religious cognition, which posits a difference between theological and basic everyday representations and processing of God concepts. Quakerism shows an overall lack of an abstract theology, with Quakers instead establishing various metaphors for God to express their lived experience of the divine. The remarkable consistency of metaphors in Quaker pamphlets suggests that Quakerism makes God concepts intuitively meaningful and relevant.

U2 - 10.1075/msw.7.1.02kol

DO - 10.1075/msw.7.1.02kol

M3 - Journal article

VL - 7

SP - 5

EP - 25

JO - Metaphor and the Social World

JF - Metaphor and the Social World

SN - 2210-4070

IS - 1

ER -