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  • Ascott et al 2021_STOTEN_author_accepted_version

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Science of the Total Environment. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Science of the Total Environment, 781, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.146698

    Accepted author manuscript, 329 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 24/03/22

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The need to integrate legacy nitrogen storage dynamics and time lags into policy and practice

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Article number146698
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>10/08/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Science of the Total Environment
Volume781
Number of pages5
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date24/03/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Increased fluxes of reactive nitrogen (Nr), often associated with N fertilizer use in agriculture, have resulted in negative environmental consequences, including eutrophication, which cost billions of dollars per year globally. To address this, best management practices (BMPs) to reduce Nr loading to the environment have been introduced in many locations. However, improvements in water quality associated with BMP implementation have not always been realised over expected timescales. There is a now a significant body of scientific evidence showing that the dynamics of legacy Nr storage and associated time lags invalidate the assumptions of many models used by policymakers for decision making regarding Nr BMPs. Building on this evidence, we believe that the concepts of legacy Nr storage dynamics and time lags need to be included in these models. We believe the biogeochemical research community could play a more proactive role in advocating for this change through both awareness raising and direct collaboration with policymakers to develop improved datasets and models. We anticipate that this will result in more realistic expectations of timescales for water quality improvements associated with BMPs. Given the need for multi-nutrient policy responses to tackle challenges such as eutrophication, integration of N stores will have the further benefit of aligning both researchers and policymakers in the N community with the phosphorus and carbon communities, where estimation of stores is more widespread. Ultimately, we anticipate that integrating legacy Nr storage dynamics and time lags into policy frameworks will better meet the needs of human and environmental health.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Science of the Total Environment. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Science of the Total Environment, 781, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.146698