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The non-display of authentic distress: public-private dualism in young people's discursive construction of self-harm

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The non-display of authentic distress : public-private dualism in young people's discursive construction of self-harm. / Scourfield, Jonathan; Roen, Katrina; McDermott, Elizabeth.

In: Sociology of Health and Illness, Vol. 33, No. 5, 07.2011, p. 777-791.

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Scourfield, Jonathan ; Roen, Katrina ; McDermott, Elizabeth. / The non-display of authentic distress : public-private dualism in young people's discursive construction of self-harm. In: Sociology of Health and Illness. 2011 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 777-791.

Bibtex

@article{9dbc9e6ce13147a89154c53b522105c2,
title = "The non-display of authentic distress: public-private dualism in young people's discursive construction of self-harm",
abstract = "This article draws from focus groups and interviews investigating how young people talk about self-harm. Some of the research participants had personal experience of self-harm but this was not a prerequisite for their inclusion in the study. Thematic coding was used initially to organise and give an overview of the data, but the data were subsequently analysed using a discourse analytic approach. The article focuses on the young people's constructions of deliberate self-harm such as 'cutting'. Throughout the focus groups and interviews, a dichotomy was set up by the young people between authentic, private self-harm which is rooted in real distress (and warrants a sympathetic response) and public, self-indulgent attempts to seek attention. This dualistic construction is discussed in some detail and located in various socio-cultural contexts. It is argued that the dualism illustrates contemporary ambivalence about mental health and youth.",
keywords = "self-harm, youth, mental health, discourse analysis, DISCOURSE",
author = "Jonathan Scourfield and Katrina Roen and Elizabeth McDermott",
year = "2011",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9566.2010.01322.x",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "777--791",
journal = "Sociology of Health and Illness",
issn = "0141-9889",
publisher = "Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The non-display of authentic distress

T2 - public-private dualism in young people's discursive construction of self-harm

AU - Scourfield, Jonathan

AU - Roen, Katrina

AU - McDermott, Elizabeth

PY - 2011/7

Y1 - 2011/7

N2 - This article draws from focus groups and interviews investigating how young people talk about self-harm. Some of the research participants had personal experience of self-harm but this was not a prerequisite for their inclusion in the study. Thematic coding was used initially to organise and give an overview of the data, but the data were subsequently analysed using a discourse analytic approach. The article focuses on the young people's constructions of deliberate self-harm such as 'cutting'. Throughout the focus groups and interviews, a dichotomy was set up by the young people between authentic, private self-harm which is rooted in real distress (and warrants a sympathetic response) and public, self-indulgent attempts to seek attention. This dualistic construction is discussed in some detail and located in various socio-cultural contexts. It is argued that the dualism illustrates contemporary ambivalence about mental health and youth.

AB - This article draws from focus groups and interviews investigating how young people talk about self-harm. Some of the research participants had personal experience of self-harm but this was not a prerequisite for their inclusion in the study. Thematic coding was used initially to organise and give an overview of the data, but the data were subsequently analysed using a discourse analytic approach. The article focuses on the young people's constructions of deliberate self-harm such as 'cutting'. Throughout the focus groups and interviews, a dichotomy was set up by the young people between authentic, private self-harm which is rooted in real distress (and warrants a sympathetic response) and public, self-indulgent attempts to seek attention. This dualistic construction is discussed in some detail and located in various socio-cultural contexts. It is argued that the dualism illustrates contemporary ambivalence about mental health and youth.

KW - self-harm

KW - youth

KW - mental health

KW - discourse analysis

KW - DISCOURSE

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2010.01322.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2010.01322.x

M3 - Journal article

VL - 33

SP - 777

EP - 791

JO - Sociology of Health and Illness

JF - Sociology of Health and Illness

SN - 0141-9889

IS - 5

ER -