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The phenomenal separateness of self: Udayana on body and agency

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The phenomenal separateness of self : Udayana on body and agency. / Ram-Prasad, Chakravarthi.

In: Asian Philosophy, Vol. 21, No. 3, 2011, p. 323-340.

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Ram-Prasad, Chakravarthi. / The phenomenal separateness of self : Udayana on body and agency. In: Asian Philosophy. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 323-340.

Bibtex

@article{8ac4d64d50e3410d8fdb33863525fd2b,
title = "The phenomenal separateness of self: Udayana on body and agency",
abstract = "Classical Indian debates about ātman—self—concern a minimal or core entity rather than richer notions of personal identity. These debates recognise that there is phenomenal unity across time; but is a core self required to explain it? Contemporary phenomenologists foreground the importance of a phenomenally unitary self, and Udayana's position is interpreted in this context as a classical Indian approach to this issue. Udayana seems to dismiss the body as the candidate for phenomenal identity in a way similar to some Western philosophers. He also provides some inkling of how alternative ways of defending phenomenal unity without self fail. A criticism of some Western phenomenological theories of self is that they do not explain how unity is provided by the {\textquoteleft}mineness{\textquoteright} of cognition. Udayana's suggestion that a sort of agency provides such an explanation can be developed as an original argument for a phenomenally unitary self. ",
author = "Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1080/09552367.2011.597929",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "323--340",
journal = "Asian Philosophy",
issn = "0955-2367",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The phenomenal separateness of self

T2 - Udayana on body and agency

AU - Ram-Prasad, Chakravarthi

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Classical Indian debates about ātman—self—concern a minimal or core entity rather than richer notions of personal identity. These debates recognise that there is phenomenal unity across time; but is a core self required to explain it? Contemporary phenomenologists foreground the importance of a phenomenally unitary self, and Udayana's position is interpreted in this context as a classical Indian approach to this issue. Udayana seems to dismiss the body as the candidate for phenomenal identity in a way similar to some Western philosophers. He also provides some inkling of how alternative ways of defending phenomenal unity without self fail. A criticism of some Western phenomenological theories of self is that they do not explain how unity is provided by the ‘mineness’ of cognition. Udayana's suggestion that a sort of agency provides such an explanation can be developed as an original argument for a phenomenally unitary self.

AB - Classical Indian debates about ātman—self—concern a minimal or core entity rather than richer notions of personal identity. These debates recognise that there is phenomenal unity across time; but is a core self required to explain it? Contemporary phenomenologists foreground the importance of a phenomenally unitary self, and Udayana's position is interpreted in this context as a classical Indian approach to this issue. Udayana seems to dismiss the body as the candidate for phenomenal identity in a way similar to some Western philosophers. He also provides some inkling of how alternative ways of defending phenomenal unity without self fail. A criticism of some Western phenomenological theories of self is that they do not explain how unity is provided by the ‘mineness’ of cognition. Udayana's suggestion that a sort of agency provides such an explanation can be developed as an original argument for a phenomenally unitary self.

U2 - 10.1080/09552367.2011.597929

DO - 10.1080/09552367.2011.597929

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 323

EP - 340

JO - Asian Philosophy

JF - Asian Philosophy

SN - 0955-2367

IS - 3

ER -