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  • The politics of neoliberalisation and resistance in Northern Ireland

    Rights statement: © Matthew Johnson 2019. The definitive, peer reviewed and edited version of this article is published in Global Discourse: An interdisciplinary journal of current affairs, Volume 9, Number 3, September 2019, pp. 503-505.

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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The politics of neoliberalisation and resistance in post-crash Northern Ireland: A reply to Byers

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The politics of neoliberalisation and resistance in post-crash Northern Ireland : A reply to Byers. / Johnson, Matthew.

In: Global Discourse, Vol. 9, No. 3, 30.09.2019, p. 503-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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@article{9da58c259a3e4b7b9a46f9c44c55eb78,
title = "The politics of neoliberalisation and resistance in post-crash Northern Ireland: A reply to Byers",
abstract = "Se{\'a}n Byers presents a comprehensive overview of the post-crash political landscape in Northern Ireland. His most significant contribution is, perhaps, the most understated: that the Blairite settlement is incapable of resolving the social cleavages that threaten any possibility of harmony. He highlights, again and again, the ways in which apparently divergent actors, such as Sinn F{\'e}in and the DUP are brought together through the demands of neoliberal governance and, in so doing, deprive their working class electorates of real change. In this reply, I argue that the current situation highlights the need for genuine transformative politics and that this is most likely to come from Britain, not the Republic.",
author = "Matthew Johnson",
note = "{\textcopyright} Matthew Johnson 2019. The definitive, peer reviewed and edited version of this article is published in Global Discourse: An interdisciplinary journal of current affairs, Volume 9, Number 3, September 2019, pp. 503-505. ",
year = "2019",
month = sep,
day = "30",
doi = "10.1332/204378919X15646708719788",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "503--505",
journal = "Global Discourse",
issn = "2326-9995",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The politics of neoliberalisation and resistance in post-crash Northern Ireland

T2 - A reply to Byers

AU - Johnson, Matthew

N1 - © Matthew Johnson 2019. The definitive, peer reviewed and edited version of this article is published in Global Discourse: An interdisciplinary journal of current affairs, Volume 9, Number 3, September 2019, pp. 503-505.

PY - 2019/9/30

Y1 - 2019/9/30

N2 - Seán Byers presents a comprehensive overview of the post-crash political landscape in Northern Ireland. His most significant contribution is, perhaps, the most understated: that the Blairite settlement is incapable of resolving the social cleavages that threaten any possibility of harmony. He highlights, again and again, the ways in which apparently divergent actors, such as Sinn Féin and the DUP are brought together through the demands of neoliberal governance and, in so doing, deprive their working class electorates of real change. In this reply, I argue that the current situation highlights the need for genuine transformative politics and that this is most likely to come from Britain, not the Republic.

AB - Seán Byers presents a comprehensive overview of the post-crash political landscape in Northern Ireland. His most significant contribution is, perhaps, the most understated: that the Blairite settlement is incapable of resolving the social cleavages that threaten any possibility of harmony. He highlights, again and again, the ways in which apparently divergent actors, such as Sinn Féin and the DUP are brought together through the demands of neoliberal governance and, in so doing, deprive their working class electorates of real change. In this reply, I argue that the current situation highlights the need for genuine transformative politics and that this is most likely to come from Britain, not the Republic.

U2 - 10.1332/204378919X15646708719788

DO - 10.1332/204378919X15646708719788

M3 - Review article

VL - 9

SP - 503

EP - 505

JO - Global Discourse

JF - Global Discourse

SN - 2326-9995

IS - 3

ER -