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The promise of makeability: digital video editing and the cinematic life

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The promise of makeability: digital video editing and the cinematic life. / Mackenzie, Adrian; Furstenau, Marc.

In: Visual Communication, Vol. 8, No. 1, 02.2009, p. 5-22.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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Mackenzie, Adrian ; Furstenau, Marc. / The promise of makeability: digital video editing and the cinematic life. In: Visual Communication. 2009 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 5-22.

Bibtex

@article{2db3917bf4404ef0bc1622f66dd51139,
title = "The promise of makeability: digital video editing and the cinematic life",
abstract = "This article analyses amateur video editing software and considers its use within a broadly defined context of cultural practices, or `everyday cinematic life'. The authors argue that such software must be understood in relation to specific cinematic discourses and in the context of longstanding promises of popular participation in `movie-making'. They situate the historically sedimented nature of audiovisual experience in terms of a geneaology of non-commercial film editing and filmmaking, and analyse the phenomenological mixture of constraints and potentials embodied by individual amateur filmmakers and implemented in popular consumer-level editing software. The figure of the video editor (the software and the individual), the authors argue, incorporates a compromise inherent to cinematic life between the propensity to `make' by appropriating forms and materials from the cinema, and the material, economic and legal constraints on making that preserve the organization of entertainment industries.",
keywords = "agency , amateur filmmaking, cinema , cinematic life , digital media , digital video , editing software",
author = "Adrian Mackenzie and Marc Furstenau",
year = "2009",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1177/1470357208096207",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "5--22",
journal = "Visual Communication",
issn = "1470-3572",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The promise of makeability: digital video editing and the cinematic life

AU - Mackenzie, Adrian

AU - Furstenau, Marc

PY - 2009/2

Y1 - 2009/2

N2 - This article analyses amateur video editing software and considers its use within a broadly defined context of cultural practices, or `everyday cinematic life'. The authors argue that such software must be understood in relation to specific cinematic discourses and in the context of longstanding promises of popular participation in `movie-making'. They situate the historically sedimented nature of audiovisual experience in terms of a geneaology of non-commercial film editing and filmmaking, and analyse the phenomenological mixture of constraints and potentials embodied by individual amateur filmmakers and implemented in popular consumer-level editing software. The figure of the video editor (the software and the individual), the authors argue, incorporates a compromise inherent to cinematic life between the propensity to `make' by appropriating forms and materials from the cinema, and the material, economic and legal constraints on making that preserve the organization of entertainment industries.

AB - This article analyses amateur video editing software and considers its use within a broadly defined context of cultural practices, or `everyday cinematic life'. The authors argue that such software must be understood in relation to specific cinematic discourses and in the context of longstanding promises of popular participation in `movie-making'. They situate the historically sedimented nature of audiovisual experience in terms of a geneaology of non-commercial film editing and filmmaking, and analyse the phenomenological mixture of constraints and potentials embodied by individual amateur filmmakers and implemented in popular consumer-level editing software. The figure of the video editor (the software and the individual), the authors argue, incorporates a compromise inherent to cinematic life between the propensity to `make' by appropriating forms and materials from the cinema, and the material, economic and legal constraints on making that preserve the organization of entertainment industries.

KW - agency

KW - amateur filmmaking

KW - cinema

KW - cinematic life

KW - digital media

KW - digital video

KW - editing software

U2 - 10.1177/1470357208096207

DO - 10.1177/1470357208096207

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - 5

EP - 22

JO - Visual Communication

JF - Visual Communication

SN - 1470-3572

IS - 1

ER -