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The role of orthographic neighbourhood effects in lateralized lexical decision: a replication study and meta-analysis

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The role of orthographic neighbourhood effects in lateralized lexical decision: a replication study and meta-analysis. / Parker, A.J.; Egan, C.; Grant, J.H.; Harte, S.; Hudson, B.T.; Woodhead, Z.V.J.

In: PeerJ, Vol. 9, e11266, 28.04.2021.

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Parker, A.J. ; Egan, C. ; Grant, J.H. ; Harte, S. ; Hudson, B.T. ; Woodhead, Z.V.J. / The role of orthographic neighbourhood effects in lateralized lexical decision: a replication study and meta-analysis. In: PeerJ. 2021 ; Vol. 9.

Bibtex

@article{dec0140d9d1f42ccaa781775e2d80a6c,
title = "The role of orthographic neighbourhood effects in lateralized lexical decision: a replication study and meta-analysis",
abstract = "The effect of orthographic neighbourhood size (N) on lexical decision reaction time differs when words are presented in the left or right visual fields. Evidence suggests a facilitatory N effect (i.e., faster reaction times for words with larger neighbourhoods) in the left visual field. However, the N effect in the right visual field remains controversial: it may have a weaker facilitative role or it may even be inhibitory. In a pre-registered online experiment, we replicated the interaction between N and visual field and provided support for an inhibitory N effect in the right visual field. We subsequently conducted a pre-registered systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesise the available evidence and determine the direction of N effects across visual fields. Based on the evidence, it would seem the effect is inhibitory in the right visual field. Furthermore, the size of the N effect is considerably smaller in the right visual field. Both studies revealed considerable heterogeneity between participants and studies, and we consider the implications of this for future work. ",
keywords = "Cerebral hemisphere, Laterality, Lateralized presentation, Meta-analysis, Orthographic neighbourhood effects, Replication, Systematic review, adult, article, female, hemispheric dominance, human, male, meta analysis, neighborhood, replication study, systematic review, visual field",
author = "A.J. Parker and C. Egan and J.H. Grant and S. Harte and B.T. Hudson and Z.V.J. Woodhead",
year = "2021",
month = apr,
day = "28",
doi = "10.7717/peerj.11266",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "PeerJ",
issn = "2167-8359",
publisher = "PeerJ Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of orthographic neighbourhood effects in lateralized lexical decision: a replication study and meta-analysis

AU - Parker, A.J.

AU - Egan, C.

AU - Grant, J.H.

AU - Harte, S.

AU - Hudson, B.T.

AU - Woodhead, Z.V.J.

PY - 2021/4/28

Y1 - 2021/4/28

N2 - The effect of orthographic neighbourhood size (N) on lexical decision reaction time differs when words are presented in the left or right visual fields. Evidence suggests a facilitatory N effect (i.e., faster reaction times for words with larger neighbourhoods) in the left visual field. However, the N effect in the right visual field remains controversial: it may have a weaker facilitative role or it may even be inhibitory. In a pre-registered online experiment, we replicated the interaction between N and visual field and provided support for an inhibitory N effect in the right visual field. We subsequently conducted a pre-registered systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesise the available evidence and determine the direction of N effects across visual fields. Based on the evidence, it would seem the effect is inhibitory in the right visual field. Furthermore, the size of the N effect is considerably smaller in the right visual field. Both studies revealed considerable heterogeneity between participants and studies, and we consider the implications of this for future work.

AB - The effect of orthographic neighbourhood size (N) on lexical decision reaction time differs when words are presented in the left or right visual fields. Evidence suggests a facilitatory N effect (i.e., faster reaction times for words with larger neighbourhoods) in the left visual field. However, the N effect in the right visual field remains controversial: it may have a weaker facilitative role or it may even be inhibitory. In a pre-registered online experiment, we replicated the interaction between N and visual field and provided support for an inhibitory N effect in the right visual field. We subsequently conducted a pre-registered systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesise the available evidence and determine the direction of N effects across visual fields. Based on the evidence, it would seem the effect is inhibitory in the right visual field. Furthermore, the size of the N effect is considerably smaller in the right visual field. Both studies revealed considerable heterogeneity between participants and studies, and we consider the implications of this for future work.

KW - Cerebral hemisphere

KW - Laterality

KW - Lateralized presentation

KW - Meta-analysis

KW - Orthographic neighbourhood effects

KW - Replication

KW - Systematic review

KW - adult

KW - article

KW - female

KW - hemispheric dominance

KW - human

KW - male

KW - meta analysis

KW - neighborhood

KW - replication study

KW - systematic review

KW - visual field

U2 - 10.7717/peerj.11266

DO - 10.7717/peerj.11266

M3 - Journal article

VL - 9

JO - PeerJ

JF - PeerJ

SN - 2167-8359

M1 - e11266

ER -