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The role of pheromones in tick biology

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The role of pheromones in tick biology. / Hamilton, J. G C.

In: Parasitology Today, Vol. 8, No. 4, 04.1992, p. 130-133.

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Hamilton, J. G C. / The role of pheromones in tick biology. In: Parasitology Today. 1992 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 130-133.

Bibtex

@article{a60064a6b80a499b999dc3bcb954e1e1,
title = "The role of pheromones in tick biology",
abstract = "Ticks are important vectors of pathogens that cause human and animal disease. Pheromones play a role of fundamental importance in intraspecies communication. Here, Gordon Hamilton discusses how these chemical messengers play a role in mate location, host location, and survival in adverse conditions, and how manipulation of this chemical communication system may provide a potential method of tick control.",
author = "Hamilton, {J. G C}",
year = "1992",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1016/0169-4758(92)90284-9",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "130--133",
journal = "Parasitology Today",
issn = "0169-4758",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of pheromones in tick biology

AU - Hamilton, J. G C

PY - 1992/4

Y1 - 1992/4

N2 - Ticks are important vectors of pathogens that cause human and animal disease. Pheromones play a role of fundamental importance in intraspecies communication. Here, Gordon Hamilton discusses how these chemical messengers play a role in mate location, host location, and survival in adverse conditions, and how manipulation of this chemical communication system may provide a potential method of tick control.

AB - Ticks are important vectors of pathogens that cause human and animal disease. Pheromones play a role of fundamental importance in intraspecies communication. Here, Gordon Hamilton discusses how these chemical messengers play a role in mate location, host location, and survival in adverse conditions, and how manipulation of this chemical communication system may provide a potential method of tick control.

U2 - 10.1016/0169-4758(92)90284-9

DO - 10.1016/0169-4758(92)90284-9

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:0026585749

VL - 8

SP - 130

EP - 133

JO - Parasitology Today

JF - Parasitology Today

SN - 0169-4758

IS - 4

ER -