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  • Bonehill_von_Benzon_Shaw_2020

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Mobilities on 14/04/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17450101.2020.1746057

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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‘The shops were only made for people who could walk’: impairment, barriers and autonomy in the mobility of adults with Cerebral Palsy in urban England

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‘The shops were only made for people who could walk’ : impairment, barriers and autonomy in the mobility of adults with Cerebral Palsy in urban England. / Bonehill, J.; von Benzon, N.; Shaw, J.

In: Mobilities, Vol. 15, No. 3, 31.05.2020, p. 341-361.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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Bonehill J, von Benzon N, Shaw J. ‘The shops were only made for people who could walk’: impairment, barriers and autonomy in the mobility of adults with Cerebral Palsy in urban England. Mobilities. 2020 May 31;15(3):341-361. Epub 2020 Apr 14. doi: 10.1080/17450101.2020.1746057

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Bibtex

@article{279383920a344e26814ddc553f616191,
title = "{\textquoteleft}The shops were only made for people who could walk{\textquoteright}: impairment, barriers and autonomy in the mobility of adults with Cerebral Palsy in urban England",
abstract = "Based on research carried out with a group of adults with Cerebral Palsy in Birmingham, UK, we consider the complex inter-relationship between the accessibility of the urban environment for those with impaired gross motor skills, and the ability of these people to lead full and independent lives. Drawing on a framework that considers mobility as movement, meaning-making and political, we demonstrate the reality of differentiated mobility. For those with bodies that function outside the presumed operating parameters of the model subjects of urban design, mobility may be possible, but is often uncomfortable and even dangerous, with significant associated effects for impaired people{\textquoteright}s autonomy. Our study details social and structural, or design, barriers to people{\textquoteright}s mobility, demonstrating the inter-connection between individuals{\textquoteright} behaviour and urban design in a manner that questions a clear distinction between the two. We draw upon the notions of emotional work and a commoning approach to mobility in suggesting that further investment in urban accessibility is squarely an issue of social justice. ",
keywords = "Cerebral Palsy, Differentiated mobility, mobile methods, urban design, video elicitation, wheelchair users",
author = "J. Bonehill and {von Benzon}, N. and J. Shaw",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Mobilities on 14/04/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17450101.2020.1746057",
year = "2020",
month = may,
day = "31",
doi = "10.1080/17450101.2020.1746057",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "341--361",
journal = "Mobilities",
issn = "1745-0101",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - ‘The shops were only made for people who could walk’

T2 - impairment, barriers and autonomy in the mobility of adults with Cerebral Palsy in urban England

AU - Bonehill, J.

AU - von Benzon, N.

AU - Shaw, J.

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Mobilities on 14/04/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17450101.2020.1746057

PY - 2020/5/31

Y1 - 2020/5/31

N2 - Based on research carried out with a group of adults with Cerebral Palsy in Birmingham, UK, we consider the complex inter-relationship between the accessibility of the urban environment for those with impaired gross motor skills, and the ability of these people to lead full and independent lives. Drawing on a framework that considers mobility as movement, meaning-making and political, we demonstrate the reality of differentiated mobility. For those with bodies that function outside the presumed operating parameters of the model subjects of urban design, mobility may be possible, but is often uncomfortable and even dangerous, with significant associated effects for impaired people’s autonomy. Our study details social and structural, or design, barriers to people’s mobility, demonstrating the inter-connection between individuals’ behaviour and urban design in a manner that questions a clear distinction between the two. We draw upon the notions of emotional work and a commoning approach to mobility in suggesting that further investment in urban accessibility is squarely an issue of social justice. 

AB - Based on research carried out with a group of adults with Cerebral Palsy in Birmingham, UK, we consider the complex inter-relationship between the accessibility of the urban environment for those with impaired gross motor skills, and the ability of these people to lead full and independent lives. Drawing on a framework that considers mobility as movement, meaning-making and political, we demonstrate the reality of differentiated mobility. For those with bodies that function outside the presumed operating parameters of the model subjects of urban design, mobility may be possible, but is often uncomfortable and even dangerous, with significant associated effects for impaired people’s autonomy. Our study details social and structural, or design, barriers to people’s mobility, demonstrating the inter-connection between individuals’ behaviour and urban design in a manner that questions a clear distinction between the two. We draw upon the notions of emotional work and a commoning approach to mobility in suggesting that further investment in urban accessibility is squarely an issue of social justice. 

KW - Cerebral Palsy

KW - Differentiated mobility

KW - mobile methods

KW - urban design

KW - video elicitation

KW - wheelchair users

U2 - 10.1080/17450101.2020.1746057

DO - 10.1080/17450101.2020.1746057

M3 - Journal article

VL - 15

SP - 341

EP - 361

JO - Mobilities

JF - Mobilities

SN - 1745-0101

IS - 3

ER -