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  • paper_igt_china_jun21

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Health Economics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Health Economics, 79, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2021.102493

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    Embargo ends: 24/01/23

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The transmission of health across 7 generations in China, 1789-1906

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
Article number102493
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/09/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Health Economics
Volume79
Number of pages15
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date24/07/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

We study the intergenerational transmission of health using registered data from China between 1789 and 1906. We first document the intergenerational correlations in lifespans, and we find much higher correlations for mothers, compared to fathers. We then compare children born from brother and twin fathers, and the intergenerational transmission from fathers becomes weaker and is likely to be mostly driven by genetic factors. On the contrary, our results suggest a strong role of women in affecting their children's health outcomes across generations in developing countries.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Health Economics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Health Economics, 79, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2021.102493