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The views of relatives of young people with psychosis on how to design a Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit (REACT)

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The views of relatives of young people with psychosis on how to design a Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit (REACT). / REACT Team.

In: Journal of Mental Health, Vol. 20, No. 6, 12.2011, p. 567-579.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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REACT Team. The views of relatives of young people with psychosis on how to design a Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit (REACT). Journal of Mental Health. 2011 Dec;20(6):567-579. doi: 10.3109/09638237.2011.593592

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REACT Team. / The views of relatives of young people with psychosis on how to design a Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit (REACT). In: Journal of Mental Health. 2011 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 567-579.

Bibtex

@article{b085abd790464b81884d7d2dd9cc8ffa,
title = "The views of relatives of young people with psychosis on how to design a Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit (REACT)",
abstract = "Background Relatives of people with psychosis experience high levels of distress. Interventions are needed which can reduce distress and are widely available. Aims This study presents the views of relatives on how to design a supported self-management intervention for relatives. Method Four focus groups were carried out and relatives were asked for their views on the content, format, support required, likely barriers and potential impact on the outcome of a self-management toolkit. Results Relatives were generally very positive about the development of a toolkit. Relatives had clear ideas about the design, emphasising particularly that it needs to be comprehensive, modular, supported and able to translate general information into the specific detail they require for their family member. Many of the ideas informed the development of Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit. Some suggestions, such as multiple modes of delivery, earlier access to the toolkit in primary care and peer support from other relatives, were not possible in this study but should be considered for future development. Conclusions Relatives supported the development of a supported self-management toolkit intervention. They also emphasised the importance of offering such interventions alongside other valued aspects of services including face-to-face contact with clinicians, peer support from other relatives and crisis support.",
author = "Fiona Lobban and David Glentworth and Gillian Haddock and Laura Wainwright and Anna Clancy and Ros Bentley and {REACT Team}",
year = "2011",
month = dec,
doi = "10.3109/09638237.2011.593592",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "567--579",
journal = "Journal of Mental Health",
issn = "0963-8237",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The views of relatives of young people with psychosis on how to design a Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit (REACT)

AU - Lobban, Fiona

AU - Glentworth, David

AU - Haddock, Gillian

AU - Wainwright, Laura

AU - Clancy, Anna

AU - Bentley, Ros

AU - REACT Team

PY - 2011/12

Y1 - 2011/12

N2 - Background Relatives of people with psychosis experience high levels of distress. Interventions are needed which can reduce distress and are widely available. Aims This study presents the views of relatives on how to design a supported self-management intervention for relatives. Method Four focus groups were carried out and relatives were asked for their views on the content, format, support required, likely barriers and potential impact on the outcome of a self-management toolkit. Results Relatives were generally very positive about the development of a toolkit. Relatives had clear ideas about the design, emphasising particularly that it needs to be comprehensive, modular, supported and able to translate general information into the specific detail they require for their family member. Many of the ideas informed the development of Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit. Some suggestions, such as multiple modes of delivery, earlier access to the toolkit in primary care and peer support from other relatives, were not possible in this study but should be considered for future development. Conclusions Relatives supported the development of a supported self-management toolkit intervention. They also emphasised the importance of offering such interventions alongside other valued aspects of services including face-to-face contact with clinicians, peer support from other relatives and crisis support.

AB - Background Relatives of people with psychosis experience high levels of distress. Interventions are needed which can reduce distress and are widely available. Aims This study presents the views of relatives on how to design a supported self-management intervention for relatives. Method Four focus groups were carried out and relatives were asked for their views on the content, format, support required, likely barriers and potential impact on the outcome of a self-management toolkit. Results Relatives were generally very positive about the development of a toolkit. Relatives had clear ideas about the design, emphasising particularly that it needs to be comprehensive, modular, supported and able to translate general information into the specific detail they require for their family member. Many of the ideas informed the development of Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit. Some suggestions, such as multiple modes of delivery, earlier access to the toolkit in primary care and peer support from other relatives, were not possible in this study but should be considered for future development. Conclusions Relatives supported the development of a supported self-management toolkit intervention. They also emphasised the importance of offering such interventions alongside other valued aspects of services including face-to-face contact with clinicians, peer support from other relatives and crisis support.

U2 - 10.3109/09638237.2011.593592

DO - 10.3109/09638237.2011.593592

M3 - Journal article

VL - 20

SP - 567

EP - 579

JO - Journal of Mental Health

JF - Journal of Mental Health

SN - 0963-8237

IS - 6

ER -