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Third party logistics: a literature review and research agenda

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Third party logistics : a literature review and research agenda. / Selviaridis, Kostas; Spring, Martin.

In: The International Journal of Logistics Management, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2007, p. 125-150.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Selviaridis, K & Spring, M 2007, 'Third party logistics: a literature review and research agenda', The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 125-150. https://doi.org/10.1108/09574090710748207

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Selviaridis, Kostas ; Spring, Martin. / Third party logistics : a literature review and research agenda. In: The International Journal of Logistics Management. 2007 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 125-150.

Bibtex

@article{e6b14874e04443d285c7d63d3bf45098,
title = "Third party logistics: a literature review and research agenda",
abstract = "Purpose– To provide a taxonomy of third party logistics (3PL) research and, based on that, to develop a research agenda for this field of study.Design/methodology/approach– The proposed 3PL research classification framework is based on a comprehensive literature review, which concentrates on peer‐reviewed journal papers published within the period 1990‐2005. A total of 114 academic sources have been retrieved and analysed in terms of research purpose and nature, method employed, theoretical approach and level of analysis.Findings– The review reveals that 3PL research is empirical‐descriptive in nature and that it generally lacks a theoretical foundation. Survey research is the dominant method employed, reflecting the positivist research tradition within logistics. It identifies certain knowledge gaps and develops five propositions for future research. It suggests that focus should be directed towards more normative, theory‐driven and qualitative method‐based studies. It also argues that further empirical research in relation to 3PL design/implementation and fourth party logistics services is needed.Originality/value– This paper fulfils an identified need for a comprehensive classification framework of 3PL studies. It essentially provides both academics and practitioners with a conceptual map of existing 3PL research and also points out opportunities for future research.",
keywords = "Third party vendors, Distribution management",
author = "Kostas Selviaridis and Martin Spring",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1108/09574090710748207",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "125--150",
journal = "The International Journal of Logistics Management",
issn = "0957-4093",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Third party logistics

T2 - a literature review and research agenda

AU - Selviaridis, Kostas

AU - Spring, Martin

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Purpose– To provide a taxonomy of third party logistics (3PL) research and, based on that, to develop a research agenda for this field of study.Design/methodology/approach– The proposed 3PL research classification framework is based on a comprehensive literature review, which concentrates on peer‐reviewed journal papers published within the period 1990‐2005. A total of 114 academic sources have been retrieved and analysed in terms of research purpose and nature, method employed, theoretical approach and level of analysis.Findings– The review reveals that 3PL research is empirical‐descriptive in nature and that it generally lacks a theoretical foundation. Survey research is the dominant method employed, reflecting the positivist research tradition within logistics. It identifies certain knowledge gaps and develops five propositions for future research. It suggests that focus should be directed towards more normative, theory‐driven and qualitative method‐based studies. It also argues that further empirical research in relation to 3PL design/implementation and fourth party logistics services is needed.Originality/value– This paper fulfils an identified need for a comprehensive classification framework of 3PL studies. It essentially provides both academics and practitioners with a conceptual map of existing 3PL research and also points out opportunities for future research.

AB - Purpose– To provide a taxonomy of third party logistics (3PL) research and, based on that, to develop a research agenda for this field of study.Design/methodology/approach– The proposed 3PL research classification framework is based on a comprehensive literature review, which concentrates on peer‐reviewed journal papers published within the period 1990‐2005. A total of 114 academic sources have been retrieved and analysed in terms of research purpose and nature, method employed, theoretical approach and level of analysis.Findings– The review reveals that 3PL research is empirical‐descriptive in nature and that it generally lacks a theoretical foundation. Survey research is the dominant method employed, reflecting the positivist research tradition within logistics. It identifies certain knowledge gaps and develops five propositions for future research. It suggests that focus should be directed towards more normative, theory‐driven and qualitative method‐based studies. It also argues that further empirical research in relation to 3PL design/implementation and fourth party logistics services is needed.Originality/value– This paper fulfils an identified need for a comprehensive classification framework of 3PL studies. It essentially provides both academics and practitioners with a conceptual map of existing 3PL research and also points out opportunities for future research.

KW - Third party vendors

KW - Distribution management

U2 - 10.1108/09574090710748207

DO - 10.1108/09574090710748207

M3 - Journal article

VL - 18

SP - 125

EP - 150

JO - The International Journal of Logistics Management

JF - The International Journal of Logistics Management

SN - 0957-4093

IS - 1

ER -