Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Toward a nuanced and targeted forest and peat f...

Electronic data

  • FORPOL_2019_540_Revision 2_V0

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Forest Policy and Economics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Forest Policy and Economics, 120, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.forpol.2020.102293

    Accepted author manuscript, 431 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 22/09/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Toward a nuanced and targeted forest and peat fires prevention policy: Insight from psychology

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
  • B. Trihadmojo
  • C.R. Jones
  • B. Prasastyoga
  • C. Walton
  • A. Sulaiman
Close
Article number102293
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/11/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Forest Policy and Economics
Volume120
Number of pages9
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date22/09/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Indonesian forest and peat fires have become global concern. Not only the fires have caused regional environmental and humanitarian crises, they also have exacerbated global climate change. Radical and rapid land use change couple with irresponsible practice of clearing land through burning are key contributing factors. In response, the Indonesian government issued a strict ban on the practice. While this policy outcome continues to shortfall, it implicates traditional farmers whose subsistence depends on such a practice. This reality necessitates effort to develop a more nuanced and targeted intervention. Thus, this study examines individual's intention to clear land using fire. We surveyed 151 Indonesian traditional farmers based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), the Norm Activation Model (NAM) and past behavior. We identified the TPB, which is augmented by the past behavior and awareness of consequences, as the optimal model for explaining variance in the intention. Implications for developing more effective educational campaigns are discussed.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Forest Policy and Economics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Forest Policy and Economics, 120, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.forpol.2020.102293