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  • T.E. Webb, Tracing an Outline of Legal Complexity, Ratio Juris (submitted version)

    Rights statement: This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Webb, T. E. (2014), Tracing an Outline of Legal Complexity. Ratio Juris, 27: 477–495. doi: 10.1111/raju.12056 , which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/raju.12056/abstract . Authors are not required to remove preprints posted prior to acceptance of the submitted version.

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Tracing an outline of legal complexity

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Tracing an outline of legal complexity. / Webb, Tom.

In: Ratio Juris, Vol. 27, No. 4, 12.2014, p. 477-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Webb, T 2014, 'Tracing an outline of legal complexity', Ratio Juris, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 477-495. https://doi.org/10.1111/raju.12056

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Vancouver

Author

Webb, Tom. / Tracing an outline of legal complexity. In: Ratio Juris. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 477-495.

Bibtex

@article{272e643463ab431d979eccd1e1107d9e,
title = "Tracing an outline of legal complexity",
abstract = "Autopoiesis and systems theory are terms often treated as synonymous by lawyers. This sleight-of-phrase elides the space between autopoiesis and systems theory, removing its content. Within this eliminated space there exist numerous understandings of systems approaches in law; one such understanding is complexity theory. Complexity theory entails a very different systems view of law to that of autopoiesis. In this paper I explore the concepts of complexity and their relevance to law. In tracing an outline of complexity, a number of contradictions, paradoxes, and additional questions are exposed which require further detailed analysis in the future.",
keywords = "complexity theory, Systems theory, autopoiesis",
author = "Tom Webb",
note = "This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Webb, T. E. (2014), Tracing an Outline of Legal Complexity. Ratio Juris, 27: 477–495. doi: 10.1111/raju.12056 , which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/raju.12056/abstract . Authors are not required to remove preprints posted prior to acceptance of the submitted version.",
year = "2014",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1111/raju.12056",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "477--495",
journal = "Ratio Juris",
issn = "0952-1917",
publisher = "Basil Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tracing an outline of legal complexity

AU - Webb, Tom

N1 - This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Webb, T. E. (2014), Tracing an Outline of Legal Complexity. Ratio Juris, 27: 477–495. doi: 10.1111/raju.12056 , which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/raju.12056/abstract . Authors are not required to remove preprints posted prior to acceptance of the submitted version.

PY - 2014/12

Y1 - 2014/12

N2 - Autopoiesis and systems theory are terms often treated as synonymous by lawyers. This sleight-of-phrase elides the space between autopoiesis and systems theory, removing its content. Within this eliminated space there exist numerous understandings of systems approaches in law; one such understanding is complexity theory. Complexity theory entails a very different systems view of law to that of autopoiesis. In this paper I explore the concepts of complexity and their relevance to law. In tracing an outline of complexity, a number of contradictions, paradoxes, and additional questions are exposed which require further detailed analysis in the future.

AB - Autopoiesis and systems theory are terms often treated as synonymous by lawyers. This sleight-of-phrase elides the space between autopoiesis and systems theory, removing its content. Within this eliminated space there exist numerous understandings of systems approaches in law; one such understanding is complexity theory. Complexity theory entails a very different systems view of law to that of autopoiesis. In this paper I explore the concepts of complexity and their relevance to law. In tracing an outline of complexity, a number of contradictions, paradoxes, and additional questions are exposed which require further detailed analysis in the future.

KW - complexity theory

KW - Systems theory

KW - autopoiesis

U2 - 10.1111/raju.12056

DO - 10.1111/raju.12056

M3 - Journal article

VL - 27

SP - 477

EP - 495

JO - Ratio Juris

JF - Ratio Juris

SN - 0952-1917

IS - 4

ER -