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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Public Health. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Public Health, 200, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2021.09.019

    Accepted author manuscript, 179 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 27/10/22

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Vaccine Hesitancy Among Working Age Adults with/without Disability in the UK

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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Vaccine Hesitancy Among Working Age Adults with/without Disability in the UK. / Emerson, Eric; Totsika, Vaso; Aitken, Zoe ; King, Tania; Hastings, Richard; Hatton, Chris; Stancliffe, Roger J.; Llewellyn, G; Kavanagh, Anne .

In: Public Health, Vol. 200, 30.11.2021, p. 106-108.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Emerson, E, Totsika, V, Aitken, Z, King, T, Hastings, R, Hatton, C, Stancliffe, RJ, Llewellyn, G & Kavanagh, A 2021, 'Vaccine Hesitancy Among Working Age Adults with/without Disability in the UK', Public Health, vol. 200, pp. 106-108.

APA

Emerson, E., Totsika, V., Aitken, Z., King, T., Hastings, R., Hatton, C., Stancliffe, R. J., Llewellyn, G., & Kavanagh, A. (2021). Vaccine Hesitancy Among Working Age Adults with/without Disability in the UK. Public Health, 200, 106-108.

Vancouver

Emerson E, Totsika V, Aitken Z, King T, Hastings R, Hatton C et al. Vaccine Hesitancy Among Working Age Adults with/without Disability in the UK. Public Health. 2021 Nov 30;200:106-108.

Author

Emerson, Eric ; Totsika, Vaso ; Aitken, Zoe ; King, Tania ; Hastings, Richard ; Hatton, Chris ; Stancliffe, Roger J. ; Llewellyn, G ; Kavanagh, Anne . / Vaccine Hesitancy Among Working Age Adults with/without Disability in the UK. In: Public Health. 2021 ; Vol. 200. pp. 106-108.

Bibtex

@article{7bc29c72d587480789e6285fc4e69196,
title = "Vaccine Hesitancy Among Working Age Adults with/without Disability in the UK",
abstract = "ObjectivesTo estimate levels of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among working-age adults with disabilities in the United Kingdom.Study designCross-sectional survey.MethodsSecondary analysis of data collected on a nationally representative sample of 10,114 respondents aged 16–64 years.ResultsThe adjusted relative risk for hesitancy among respondents with a disability was 0.92 (95% CI 0.67–1.27). There were stronger associations between gender and hesitancy and ethnic status and hesitancy among participants with a disability. The most common reasons cited by people with disabilities who were hesitant were: concern about the future effects of the vaccine, not trusting vaccines and concern about the side effects of vaccination.ConclusionsThe higher rates of vaccine hesitancy among women with disabilities and among people from minority ethnic groups with disabilities are concerning.",
keywords = "Disability, Vaccine hesitancy, COVID-19, Gender",
author = "Eric Emerson and Vaso Totsika and Zoe Aitken and Tania King and Richard Hastings and Chris Hatton and Stancliffe, {Roger J.} and G Llewellyn and Anne Kavanagh",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Public Health. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Public Health, 200, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2021.09.019",
year = "2021",
month = nov,
day = "30",
language = "English",
volume = "200",
pages = "106--108",
journal = "Public Health",
issn = "0033-3506",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vaccine Hesitancy Among Working Age Adults with/without Disability in the UK

AU - Emerson, Eric

AU - Totsika, Vaso

AU - Aitken, Zoe

AU - King, Tania

AU - Hastings, Richard

AU - Hatton, Chris

AU - Stancliffe, Roger J.

AU - Llewellyn, G

AU - Kavanagh, Anne

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Public Health. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Public Health, 200, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2021.09.019

PY - 2021/11/30

Y1 - 2021/11/30

N2 - ObjectivesTo estimate levels of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among working-age adults with disabilities in the United Kingdom.Study designCross-sectional survey.MethodsSecondary analysis of data collected on a nationally representative sample of 10,114 respondents aged 16–64 years.ResultsThe adjusted relative risk for hesitancy among respondents with a disability was 0.92 (95% CI 0.67–1.27). There were stronger associations between gender and hesitancy and ethnic status and hesitancy among participants with a disability. The most common reasons cited by people with disabilities who were hesitant were: concern about the future effects of the vaccine, not trusting vaccines and concern about the side effects of vaccination.ConclusionsThe higher rates of vaccine hesitancy among women with disabilities and among people from minority ethnic groups with disabilities are concerning.

AB - ObjectivesTo estimate levels of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among working-age adults with disabilities in the United Kingdom.Study designCross-sectional survey.MethodsSecondary analysis of data collected on a nationally representative sample of 10,114 respondents aged 16–64 years.ResultsThe adjusted relative risk for hesitancy among respondents with a disability was 0.92 (95% CI 0.67–1.27). There were stronger associations between gender and hesitancy and ethnic status and hesitancy among participants with a disability. The most common reasons cited by people with disabilities who were hesitant were: concern about the future effects of the vaccine, not trusting vaccines and concern about the side effects of vaccination.ConclusionsThe higher rates of vaccine hesitancy among women with disabilities and among people from minority ethnic groups with disabilities are concerning.

KW - Disability

KW - Vaccine hesitancy

KW - COVID-19

KW - Gender

M3 - Journal article

VL - 200

SP - 106

EP - 108

JO - Public Health

JF - Public Health

SN - 0033-3506

ER -