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  • Giannoulis, Sas, VibeRate

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VibeRate: an affective wearable tool for creative design

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNConference contribution/Paperpeer-review

Published
Publication date3/10/2013
Host publicationACII 2013 5th biannual Humaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII 2013)
Place of PublicationPiscataway, N.J.
PublisherIEEE
Pages594-599
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9780769550480
<mark>Original language</mark>English
Event2013 Humaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction - Geneva, Switzerland
Duration: 2/09/20135/09/2013

Conference

Conference2013 Humaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction
Country/TerritorySwitzerland
CityGeneva
Period2/09/135/09/13

Conference

Conference2013 Humaine Association Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction
Country/TerritorySwitzerland
CityGeneva
Period2/09/135/09/13

Abstract

Creative design is both cognitively and emotionally demanding. While some work has explored the value of emotional arousal in the design process, we know little about how designers’ awareness and self-regulation of arousal impact early design stages. This paper describes the design and evaluation of VibeRate, an affective wearable system integrating haptic vibrations for signaling increase of arousal levels. We employed an experimental study with 27 designers to explore the value of haptic feedback, expertise and constraints of the design tasks on the number of selected design exemplars. Findings show that approximately 40% of the images novice and expert designers select during the design process elicit high arousal and novice designers select more inspiring images based on the increase of arousal levels when haptic feedback is activated. These findings have implications for design tools supporting arousal-based capturing of design exemplars, and for design training.

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©2013 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.