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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Geoforum. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Geoforum, 125, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.geoforum.2021.07.003

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    Embargo ends: 13/07/23

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Voluntary support in a post-welfare state: Experiences and challenges of precarity

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

E-pub ahead of print
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>31/10/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Geoforum
Volume125
Number of pages9
Pages (from-to)87-95
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date13/07/21
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This paper examines voluntary sector care and support provision under a context of significantly reduced government funding. Whilst geographers have analysed the causes and aftermath of austerity on different populations, our focus is on how managers of voluntary sector organisations have had to learn and evolve through bidding for non-statutory funding to sustain their core provision. Drawing on research with voluntary support organisations in the learning disability social care sector in England and Scotland, the paper examines the effects of the state's continued reliance on the sector for core ‘public’ services whilst simultaneously withdrawing its funding. Using accounts from managers, the paper offers a particularly novel and potent example of voluntary sector precarity and the deepening unfinished and unsettled nature of care and support that has unfolded in the wake of austerity. Through the empirical research, attention is drawn to three levels of precarity that are experienced by those seeking to sustain voluntary support provision: voluntary sector organisation and structures, the voluntary sector workforce, and individual managers’ everyday emotional and affective experiences.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Geoforum. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Geoforum, 125, 2021 DOI: 10.1016/j.geoforum.2021.07.003