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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Empirical Finance. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Empirical Finance, 38, Part A, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jempfin.2016.07.003

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Wealth fluctuations and investment in risky assets: the UK micro evidence on households asset allocation

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>09/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Empirical Finance
Issue numberPart A
Volume38
Number of pages15
Pages (from-to)221-235
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date7/07/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This paper is the first to examine whether UK households exhibit constant or time-varying relative risk aversion within a microdata panel framework. We analyse whether portfolio allocations in risky assets change in response to fluctuations in wealth. Our set of controls for background wealth is comprehensive, and include, as a novelty in this type of studies, pension wealth. The inference about the risk profile of British households depends upon the relevant measure of background wealth. We do not find support for decreasing relative risk aversion (DRRA). Constant relative risk aversion (CRRA) prevails for the case of liquid wealth, but for the broadest definitions —those including home equity and pensions— the evidence favours increasing relative risk aversion (IRRA).

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Empirical Finance. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Empirical Finance, 38, Part A, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jempfin.2016.07.003