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What do relatives experience when supporting someone in early psychosis?

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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What do relatives experience when supporting someone in early psychosis? / Wainwright, Laura; Glentworth, David ; Haddock, Gillian; Bentley, Ros; Lobban, Fiona.

In: Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, Vol. 88, No. 1, 2014, p. 105-119.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Wainwright, L, Glentworth, D, Haddock, G, Bentley, R & Lobban, F 2014, 'What do relatives experience when supporting someone in early psychosis?', Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, vol. 88, no. 1, pp. 105-119. https://doi.org/10.1111/papt.12024

APA

Wainwright, L., Glentworth, D., Haddock, G., Bentley, R., & Lobban, F. (2014). What do relatives experience when supporting someone in early psychosis? Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 88(1), 105-119. https://doi.org/10.1111/papt.12024

Vancouver

Wainwright L, Glentworth D, Haddock G, Bentley R, Lobban F. What do relatives experience when supporting someone in early psychosis? Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice. 2014;88(1):105-119. https://doi.org/10.1111/papt.12024

Author

Wainwright, Laura ; Glentworth, David ; Haddock, Gillian ; Bentley, Ros ; Lobban, Fiona. / What do relatives experience when supporting someone in early psychosis?. In: Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice. 2014 ; Vol. 88, No. 1. pp. 105-119.

Bibtex

@article{70918174a09c44048136710752401339,
title = "What do relatives experience when supporting someone in early psychosis?",
abstract = "ObjectivesIn the United Kingdom (UK), the government has set out priorities to support relatives and carers. Despite this, many relatives of people experiencing psychosis continue to feel unsupported by mental health services. This may be due to lack of funding, high caseloads for mental health professionals, or due to a lack of understanding of what relatives experience as a result of their family member's psychosis. This research aimed to explore relatives{\textquoteright} experiences of supporting a relative in early psychosis.DesignThematic analysis was used to conduct an in-depth study of relatives{\textquoteright} experiences of supporting a family member in early psychosis.MethodsEligible individuals were recruited via local National Health Service Early Intervention Teams and other carer support agencies. Four focus groups were conducted, each with a range of five to seven participants.ResultsFour key themes {\textquoteleft}reflecting relatives{\textquoteright} understanding and management of psychosis were identified: {\textquoteleft}Psychosis from the relatives{\textquoteright} perspective{\textquoteright}; {\textquoteleft}Relatives{\textquoteright} fight with the mental health {\textquoteleft}system{\textquoteright}; {\textquoteleft}Is anybody listening? Does anyone understand?{\textquoteright}; and {\textquoteleft}Relatives{\textquoteright} coping{\textquoteright}. Clinical implications of these themes are discussed.ConclusionsThis study has clear implications for improvement in how relatives are supported in the United Kingdom, such as; clearer guidance for staff about confidentiality, treating relatives as partners in care and providing better quality information for relatives.",
author = "Laura Wainwright and David Glentworth and Gillian Haddock and Ros Bentley and Fiona Lobban",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1111/papt.12024",
language = "English",
volume = "88",
pages = "105--119",
journal = "Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice",
issn = "1476-0835",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - What do relatives experience when supporting someone in early psychosis?

AU - Wainwright, Laura

AU - Glentworth, David

AU - Haddock, Gillian

AU - Bentley, Ros

AU - Lobban, Fiona

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - ObjectivesIn the United Kingdom (UK), the government has set out priorities to support relatives and carers. Despite this, many relatives of people experiencing psychosis continue to feel unsupported by mental health services. This may be due to lack of funding, high caseloads for mental health professionals, or due to a lack of understanding of what relatives experience as a result of their family member's psychosis. This research aimed to explore relatives’ experiences of supporting a relative in early psychosis.DesignThematic analysis was used to conduct an in-depth study of relatives’ experiences of supporting a family member in early psychosis.MethodsEligible individuals were recruited via local National Health Service Early Intervention Teams and other carer support agencies. Four focus groups were conducted, each with a range of five to seven participants.ResultsFour key themes ‘reflecting relatives’ understanding and management of psychosis were identified: ‘Psychosis from the relatives’ perspective’; ‘Relatives’ fight with the mental health ‘system’; ‘Is anybody listening? Does anyone understand?’; and ‘Relatives’ coping’. Clinical implications of these themes are discussed.ConclusionsThis study has clear implications for improvement in how relatives are supported in the United Kingdom, such as; clearer guidance for staff about confidentiality, treating relatives as partners in care and providing better quality information for relatives.

AB - ObjectivesIn the United Kingdom (UK), the government has set out priorities to support relatives and carers. Despite this, many relatives of people experiencing psychosis continue to feel unsupported by mental health services. This may be due to lack of funding, high caseloads for mental health professionals, or due to a lack of understanding of what relatives experience as a result of their family member's psychosis. This research aimed to explore relatives’ experiences of supporting a relative in early psychosis.DesignThematic analysis was used to conduct an in-depth study of relatives’ experiences of supporting a family member in early psychosis.MethodsEligible individuals were recruited via local National Health Service Early Intervention Teams and other carer support agencies. Four focus groups were conducted, each with a range of five to seven participants.ResultsFour key themes ‘reflecting relatives’ understanding and management of psychosis were identified: ‘Psychosis from the relatives’ perspective’; ‘Relatives’ fight with the mental health ‘system’; ‘Is anybody listening? Does anyone understand?’; and ‘Relatives’ coping’. Clinical implications of these themes are discussed.ConclusionsThis study has clear implications for improvement in how relatives are supported in the United Kingdom, such as; clearer guidance for staff about confidentiality, treating relatives as partners in care and providing better quality information for relatives.

U2 - 10.1111/papt.12024

DO - 10.1111/papt.12024

M3 - Journal article

VL - 88

SP - 105

EP - 119

JO - Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice

JF - Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice

SN - 1476-0835

IS - 1

ER -