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Why solar radiation management geoengineering and democracy won’t mix

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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Why solar radiation management geoengineering and democracy won’t mix. / Szerszynski, Bronislaw; Kearnes, Matthew; Macnaghten, Phil; Owen, Richard; Stilgoe, Jack.

In: Environment and Planning A, Vol. 45, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 2809-2816.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Szerszynski, B, Kearnes, M, Macnaghten, P, Owen, R & Stilgoe, J 2013, 'Why solar radiation management geoengineering and democracy won’t mix', Environment and Planning A, vol. 45, no. 12, pp. 2809-2816. https://doi.org/10.1068/a45649

APA

Szerszynski, B., Kearnes, M., Macnaghten, P., Owen, R., & Stilgoe, J. (2013). Why solar radiation management geoengineering and democracy won’t mix. Environment and Planning A, 45(12), 2809-2816. https://doi.org/10.1068/a45649

Vancouver

Szerszynski B, Kearnes M, Macnaghten P, Owen R, Stilgoe J. Why solar radiation management geoengineering and democracy won’t mix. Environment and Planning A. 2013 Dec;45(12):2809-2816. https://doi.org/10.1068/a45649

Author

Szerszynski, Bronislaw ; Kearnes, Matthew ; Macnaghten, Phil ; Owen, Richard ; Stilgoe, Jack. / Why solar radiation management geoengineering and democracy won’t mix. In: Environment and Planning A. 2013 ; Vol. 45, No. 12. pp. 2809-2816.

Bibtex

@article{478c91283469417dad77ba2e8f9722df,
title = "Why solar radiation management geoengineering and democracy won{\textquoteright}t mix",
abstract = "In this paper we argue that recent policy treatments of solar radiation management (SRM) have insufficiently addressed its potential implications for contemporary political systems. Exploring the emerging {\textquoteleft}social constitution{\textquoteright} of SRM, we outline four reasons why this is likely to pose immense challenges to liberal democratic politics: that the unequal distribution of and uncertainties about SRM impacts will cause conflicts within existing institutions; that SRM will act at the planetary level and necessitate autocratic governance; that the motivations for SRM will always be plural and unstable; and that SRM will become conditioned by economic forces.",
keywords = "solar radiation management, geoengineering , governance, politics, democracy, social constitution of technology",
author = "Bronislaw Szerszynski and Matthew Kearnes and Phil Macnaghten and Richard Owen and Jack Stilgoe",
year = "2013",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1068/a45649",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "2809--2816",
journal = "Environment and Planning A",
issn = "0308-518X",
publisher = "SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Why solar radiation management geoengineering and democracy won’t mix

AU - Szerszynski, Bronislaw

AU - Kearnes, Matthew

AU - Macnaghten, Phil

AU - Owen, Richard

AU - Stilgoe, Jack

PY - 2013/12

Y1 - 2013/12

N2 - In this paper we argue that recent policy treatments of solar radiation management (SRM) have insufficiently addressed its potential implications for contemporary political systems. Exploring the emerging ‘social constitution’ of SRM, we outline four reasons why this is likely to pose immense challenges to liberal democratic politics: that the unequal distribution of and uncertainties about SRM impacts will cause conflicts within existing institutions; that SRM will act at the planetary level and necessitate autocratic governance; that the motivations for SRM will always be plural and unstable; and that SRM will become conditioned by economic forces.

AB - In this paper we argue that recent policy treatments of solar radiation management (SRM) have insufficiently addressed its potential implications for contemporary political systems. Exploring the emerging ‘social constitution’ of SRM, we outline four reasons why this is likely to pose immense challenges to liberal democratic politics: that the unequal distribution of and uncertainties about SRM impacts will cause conflicts within existing institutions; that SRM will act at the planetary level and necessitate autocratic governance; that the motivations for SRM will always be plural and unstable; and that SRM will become conditioned by economic forces.

KW - solar radiation management

KW - geoengineering

KW - governance

KW - politics

KW - democracy

KW - social constitution of technology

U2 - 10.1068/a45649

DO - 10.1068/a45649

M3 - Journal article

VL - 45

SP - 2809

EP - 2816

JO - Environment and Planning A

JF - Environment and Planning A

SN - 0308-518X

IS - 12

ER -