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Yoga for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work

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Yoga for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work. / Hartfiel, N; Burton, C; Rycroft-Malone, J; Clarke, G; Havenhand, J; Khalsa, S B; Edwards, R T.

In: Occupational Medicine, Vol. 62, No. 8, 08.12.2012, p. 606-612.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Hartfiel, N, Burton, C, Rycroft-Malone, J, Clarke, G, Havenhand, J, Khalsa, SB & Edwards, RT 2012, 'Yoga for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work', Occupational Medicine, vol. 62, no. 8, pp. 606-612. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqs168

APA

Hartfiel, N., Burton, C., Rycroft-Malone, J., Clarke, G., Havenhand, J., Khalsa, S. B., & Edwards, R. T. (2012). Yoga for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work. Occupational Medicine, 62(8), 606-612. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqs168

Vancouver

Hartfiel N, Burton C, Rycroft-Malone J, Clarke G, Havenhand J, Khalsa SB et al. Yoga for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work. Occupational Medicine. 2012 Dec 8;62(8):606-612. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqs168

Author

Hartfiel, N ; Burton, C ; Rycroft-Malone, J ; Clarke, G ; Havenhand, J ; Khalsa, S B ; Edwards, R T. / Yoga for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work. In: Occupational Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 62, No. 8. pp. 606-612.

Bibtex

@article{a5679bdb038c4cd096d86043b21d08e8,
title = "Yoga for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work",
abstract = "BackgroundStress and back pain are two key factors leading to sickness absence at work. Recent research indicates that yoga can be effective for reducing perceived stress, alleviating back pain, and improving psychological well-being.AimsTo determine the effectiveness of a yoga-based intervention for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work.MethodsParticipants were recruited from a British local government authority and randomized into a yoga group who received one 50min Dru Yoga session each week for 8 weeks and a 20min DVD for home practice and a control group who received no intervention. Baseline and end-programme measurements of self-reported stress, back pain and psychological well-being were assessed with the Perceived Stress Scale, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale.ResultsThere were 37 participants in each group. Analysis of variance and multiple linear regression showed that in comparison to the control group, the yoga group reported significant reductions in perceived stress and back pain, and a substantial improvement in psychological well-being. When compared with the control group at the end of the programme, the yoga group scores were significantly lower for perceived stress, back pain, sadness and hostility, and substantially higher for feeling self-assured, attentive and serene.ConclusionsThe results indicate that a workplace yoga intervention can reduce perceived stress and back pain and improve psychological well-being. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the broader efficacy of yoga for improving workplace productivity and reducing sickness absence.",
keywords = "Adult, Analysis of Variance, Back Pain, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Occupational Diseases, Perception, Stress, Psychological, Surveys and Questionnaires, Treatment Outcome, Workplace, Yoga, Journal Article, Randomized Controlled Trial, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't",
author = "N Hartfiel and C Burton and J Rycroft-Malone and G Clarke and J Havenhand and Khalsa, {S B} and Edwards, {R T}",
year = "2012",
month = dec,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1093/occmed/kqs168",
language = "English",
volume = "62",
pages = "606--612",
journal = "Occupational Medicine",
issn = "0962-7480",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Yoga for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work

AU - Hartfiel, N

AU - Burton, C

AU - Rycroft-Malone, J

AU - Clarke, G

AU - Havenhand, J

AU - Khalsa, S B

AU - Edwards, R T

PY - 2012/12/8

Y1 - 2012/12/8

N2 - BackgroundStress and back pain are two key factors leading to sickness absence at work. Recent research indicates that yoga can be effective for reducing perceived stress, alleviating back pain, and improving psychological well-being.AimsTo determine the effectiveness of a yoga-based intervention for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work.MethodsParticipants were recruited from a British local government authority and randomized into a yoga group who received one 50min Dru Yoga session each week for 8 weeks and a 20min DVD for home practice and a control group who received no intervention. Baseline and end-programme measurements of self-reported stress, back pain and psychological well-being were assessed with the Perceived Stress Scale, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale.ResultsThere were 37 participants in each group. Analysis of variance and multiple linear regression showed that in comparison to the control group, the yoga group reported significant reductions in perceived stress and back pain, and a substantial improvement in psychological well-being. When compared with the control group at the end of the programme, the yoga group scores were significantly lower for perceived stress, back pain, sadness and hostility, and substantially higher for feeling self-assured, attentive and serene.ConclusionsThe results indicate that a workplace yoga intervention can reduce perceived stress and back pain and improve psychological well-being. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the broader efficacy of yoga for improving workplace productivity and reducing sickness absence.

AB - BackgroundStress and back pain are two key factors leading to sickness absence at work. Recent research indicates that yoga can be effective for reducing perceived stress, alleviating back pain, and improving psychological well-being.AimsTo determine the effectiveness of a yoga-based intervention for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work.MethodsParticipants were recruited from a British local government authority and randomized into a yoga group who received one 50min Dru Yoga session each week for 8 weeks and a 20min DVD for home practice and a control group who received no intervention. Baseline and end-programme measurements of self-reported stress, back pain and psychological well-being were assessed with the Perceived Stress Scale, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale.ResultsThere were 37 participants in each group. Analysis of variance and multiple linear regression showed that in comparison to the control group, the yoga group reported significant reductions in perceived stress and back pain, and a substantial improvement in psychological well-being. When compared with the control group at the end of the programme, the yoga group scores were significantly lower for perceived stress, back pain, sadness and hostility, and substantially higher for feeling self-assured, attentive and serene.ConclusionsThe results indicate that a workplace yoga intervention can reduce perceived stress and back pain and improve psychological well-being. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the broader efficacy of yoga for improving workplace productivity and reducing sickness absence.

KW - Adult

KW - Analysis of Variance

KW - Back Pain

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Occupational Diseases

KW - Perception

KW - Stress, Psychological

KW - Surveys and Questionnaires

KW - Treatment Outcome

KW - Workplace

KW - Yoga

KW - Journal Article

KW - Randomized Controlled Trial

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1093/occmed/kqs168

DO - 10.1093/occmed/kqs168

M3 - Journal article

VL - 62

SP - 606

EP - 612

JO - Occupational Medicine

JF - Occupational Medicine

SN - 0962-7480

IS - 8

ER -