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‘You said, we did’: A corpus-based analysis of marketising discourse in healthcare websites

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‘You said, we did’ : A corpus-based analysis of marketising discourse in healthcare websites. / Chałupnik, Małgorzata; Brookes, Gavin.

In: Text and Talk, Vol. 41, No. 5-6, 26.10.2021.

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Chałupnik M, Brookes G. ‘You said, we did’: A corpus-based analysis of marketising discourse in healthcare websites. Text and Talk. 2021 Oct 26;41(5-6). Epub 2021 Aug 12. doi: 10.1515/text-2020-0038

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@article{f1f9b25695c24bdf97d98417d0d14899,
title = "{\textquoteleft}You said, we did{\textquoteright}: A corpus-based analysis of marketising discourse in healthcare websites",
abstract = "In recent years, social and political commentators have criticised the ongoing marketisation of the UK{\textquoteright}s state-based healthcare system, the National Health Service (NHS). This paper examines the websites of 187 NHS{\textquoteright}s Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), exploring how the CCGs represent themselves and their actions, and considering the extent to which these reflect and indeed enact this process of marketisation. Taking a corpus-based approach to Critical Discourse Studies, the analysis shows how the CCGs represent themselves as accountable, collaborative, patient-centred, responsive and self-determining organisations. It is thus argued that these websites function as forms of {\textquoteleft}prestige advertising{\textquoteright}, reflecting the increasingly marketised nature of contemporary UK healthcare. Following the analysis, the potential motivations for these representations are considered, as are their possible implications for website users and the broader UK healthcare landscape.",
keywords = "Advertising, Corpus linguistics, Critical discourse studies, Healthcare communication, Marketisation, Transitivity",
author = "Ma{\l}gorzata Cha{\l}upnik and Gavin Brookes",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
day = "26",
doi = "10.1515/text-2020-0038",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
journal = "Text and Talk",
issn = "1860-7330",
publisher = "Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG",
number = "5-6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - ‘You said, we did’

T2 - A corpus-based analysis of marketising discourse in healthcare websites

AU - Chałupnik, Małgorzata

AU - Brookes, Gavin

PY - 2021/10/26

Y1 - 2021/10/26

N2 - In recent years, social and political commentators have criticised the ongoing marketisation of the UK’s state-based healthcare system, the National Health Service (NHS). This paper examines the websites of 187 NHS’s Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), exploring how the CCGs represent themselves and their actions, and considering the extent to which these reflect and indeed enact this process of marketisation. Taking a corpus-based approach to Critical Discourse Studies, the analysis shows how the CCGs represent themselves as accountable, collaborative, patient-centred, responsive and self-determining organisations. It is thus argued that these websites function as forms of ‘prestige advertising’, reflecting the increasingly marketised nature of contemporary UK healthcare. Following the analysis, the potential motivations for these representations are considered, as are their possible implications for website users and the broader UK healthcare landscape.

AB - In recent years, social and political commentators have criticised the ongoing marketisation of the UK’s state-based healthcare system, the National Health Service (NHS). This paper examines the websites of 187 NHS’s Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), exploring how the CCGs represent themselves and their actions, and considering the extent to which these reflect and indeed enact this process of marketisation. Taking a corpus-based approach to Critical Discourse Studies, the analysis shows how the CCGs represent themselves as accountable, collaborative, patient-centred, responsive and self-determining organisations. It is thus argued that these websites function as forms of ‘prestige advertising’, reflecting the increasingly marketised nature of contemporary UK healthcare. Following the analysis, the potential motivations for these representations are considered, as are their possible implications for website users and the broader UK healthcare landscape.

KW - Advertising

KW - Corpus linguistics

KW - Critical discourse studies

KW - Healthcare communication

KW - Marketisation

KW - Transitivity

U2 - 10.1515/text-2020-0038

DO - 10.1515/text-2020-0038

M3 - Journal article

VL - 41

JO - Text and Talk

JF - Text and Talk

SN - 1860-7330

IS - 5-6

ER -