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Viktor Tsepelin supervises 3 postgraduate research students. If these students have produced research profiles, these are listed below:

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Dr Viktor Tsepelin

Reader in Low Temperature Physics

Viktor Tsepelin

Lancaster University

Physics Building

LA1 4YB

Lancaster

Tel: +44 1524 593757

PhD supervision

Please contact me if you are interested in PhD in low temperature physics. PhD projects are available on experimental observations and computer simulations of quantum turbulence, probing of superfluid 3He and 4He using conventional and nano-electromechanical oscillators, cooling nano-electromechanical objects to low temperature.

Research Interests

My core speciality is low temperature physics. Research at ultralow temperatures is a critical discipline that has a large impact on society. MRI machines in hospitals, CERN apparatus and prototype quantum computers are available because of low temperature physics. By cooling material down, the thermal motion of atoms and electrons is arrested, revealing the subtle nature of quantum mechanics and associated effects, which are hidden at room temperature. For example, helium gas (4He), used for party balloons and scuba-diving, along with its lighter and much rarer isotope 3He, are the only substances which remain liquid and do not freeze even at absolute zero of temperature. Instead of turning into a solid, 3He and 4He liquids exhibit superfluidity, the ability to flow without dissipation and become motionless (irrotational) with respect to the background stars of the universe. Superfluid 3He is an exotic quantum system (it is made up of three different superfluids called mass-, spin- and orbital-superfluids), and can be used to model many other areas of physics ranging from complex classical systems to cosmology. In my research, I agitate and destroy the superfluid condensate using a variety of mechanical oscillators to learn about processes in the early universe and turbulence.

Career Details

I have graduated from Tartu University in Estonia. During my doctorate degree at the Low Temperature Laboratory at Helsinki University of Technology I have conducted optical studies of morphology and growth kinetics of helium-3 crystals below 1 mK. After doctorate degree I have spent three years at the Stanford University researching magnetization of superfluid Helium-3 in the vicinity of superfluid transition. Presently I am a member of Lancaster Ultra Low Temperature Group.

Current Teaching

PHYS112 - 1st year undergraduate course on Integration

PHYS132 - 1st year undergraduate course on Basic Physics Skills (Problem Solving and Data Analysis)

PHYS352 - 3rd year undergraduate Low Temperature Physics laboratory (Superfluidity and Superconductivity)   

PhD Supervisions Completed

2016 - Sean Ahlstrom - "Quasiparticle Beam Prole Measurements in Superfluid Helium 3 - B"

2015 - Andrew John Woods - "Visualisation of Quantum Turbulence in Superfluid 3He-B Using a Novel 2D Quasiparticle Detector"

2014 - Edward Ashley Guise - "Developing a Quasiparticle Detector for Quantum Turbulence Imaging Studies in Superfluid 3He-B"

2011 - Martin Jackson - "A Study of Quantum Turbulence in Superfluid 3He-B Using Vibrating Structures"

PhDs Examined

2017 – PhD Thesis, Kosice - Frantisek Vavrek “Spin and Quasiparticle Dynamics in Superfluid 3He-B at Zero Temperature Limit”

2014 – PhD Thesis, Royal Holloway University – Kristian Kent “Development and Characterisation of New Exfoliated Graphite Substrates for the Study of Adsorbed Helium Films”

2014 – PhD Thesis, Manchester University – Fatemeh Pakpour “Investigation of Quantum Turbulence in Superfluid 4He Using Injected Ions and 2He∗ Molecules in the Zero Temperature Limit”

2012 – PhD Thesis, Manchester University – Peter Thompson “Motion of Charged Quantized Vortex Lines in Superfluid 4He in the Low Temperature Limit”

2011 – PhD Thesis, Nottingham University – Kunal Lulla “Dissipation and Nonlinear Effects in Nanomechanical Resonators at Low Temperatures”

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