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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Radiation Measurement. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Radiation Measurement, 92, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.radmeas.2016.08.002

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Coded-aperture imaging systems: past, present and future development - a review

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>09/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Radiation Measurements
Volume92
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)59-71
Publication statusPublished
Early online date3/08/16
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Scintillator based coded-aperture imaging has proven to be effective when applied for X- and gamma-ray detection. Adaptation of the same method for neutron imaging has resulted in a number of propitious systems, which could be potentially employed for neutron detection in security and nuclear decommissioning applications. Recently developed scintillator based coded-aperture imagers reveal that localisation of neutron sources using this technique may be feasible, since pulse shape discrimination algorithms implemented in the digital domain can reliably separate gamma-rays from fast neutron interactions occurring within an organic scintillator. Moreover, recent advancements in the development of solid organic scintillators make them a viable solution for nuclear decommissioning applications as they present less hazardous characteristics than currently dominating liquid scintillation detectors. In this paper existing applications of coded-apertures for radiation detection are critically reviewed, highlighting potential improvements for coded-aperture based neutron source localisation. Further, the suitability of coded-apertures for neutron imaging in nuclear decommissioning is also assessed using Monte-Carlo modelling.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Radiation Measurement. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Radiation Measurement, 92, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.radmeas.2016.08.002