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    Rights statement: © Copyright is held by the owner/author(s). Publication rights licensed to ACM, 2016. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in CHI EA '16 Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2851581.2892574

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Design fiction: how to build a Voight Kampff machine

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsConference contribution

Published
Publication date9/05/2016
Host publicationCHI EA '16 Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherACM
Pages375-386
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781450340823
Original languageEnglish
EventCHI 2016 - California, San Jose, United States
Duration: 7/05/201612/05/2016

Conference

ConferenceCHI 2016
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose
Period7/05/1612/05/16

Conference

ConferenceCHI 2016
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose
Period7/05/1612/05/16

Abstract

Tyrell: Is this to be an empathy test? Capillary dilation of the so-called blush response? Fluctuation of the pupil. Involuntary dilation of the iris...
Deckard: We call it Voight-Kampff for short.
Design fiction is a broad term that occupies a space within the wider miscellany of speculative design approaches and is appearing as a nasent method for HCI research. The factor that differentiates and distinguishes designs fiction from other approaches is its novel use of world building and in this paper we consider whether there is value in creating fictional research worlds through which we might consider future interactions. As an example we build a world in which algorithms for detecting empathy will become a major compnent of future communications. We take inspiration from the sci-fi film Blade Runner in order to consider what a plausible world, in which it is useful to build a Voight-Kampff machine, might be like.

Bibliographic note

© Copyright is held by the owner/author(s). Publication rights licensed to ACM, 2016. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in CHI EA '16 Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2851581.2892574