Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > First dynamic model of dissolved organic carbon...

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

First dynamic model of dissolved organic carbon derived directly from high frequency observations through contiguous storms

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

First dynamic model of dissolved organic carbon derived directly from high frequency observations through contiguous storms. / Jones, Timothy D.; Chappell, Nick A.; Tych, Wlodek.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 48, No. 22, 2014, p. 13289-13297.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{d0c4a8ef09c04caab8a2c6b68d2fe819,
title = "First dynamic model of dissolved organic carbon derived directly from high frequency observations through contiguous storms",
abstract = "The first dynamic model of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export in streams derived directly from high frequency (sub-hourly) observations sampled at a regular interval through contiguous storms is presented. The optimal model, identified using the recently developed RIVC algorithm, captured the rapid dynamics of DOC load from 15-minute monitored rainfall with high simulation efficiencies and constrained uncertainty with a second-order (two-pathway) structure. Most of the DOC export in the four headwater basins studied was associated with the faster hydrometric pathway (also modelled in parallel), and was soon exhausted in the slower pathway. A delay in the DOC mobilisation became apparent as the ambient temperatures increased. These features of the component pathways were quantified in the dynamic response characteristics (DRCs) identified by RIVC. The model and associated DRCs are intended as a foundation for a better understanding of storm-related DOC dynamics and predictability, given the increasing availability of sub-hourly DOC concentration data.",
author = "Jones, {Timothy D.} and Chappell, {Nick A.} and Wlodek Tych",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1021/es503506m",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "13289--13297",
journal = "Environmental Science and Technology",
issn = "0013-936X",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "22",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - First dynamic model of dissolved organic carbon derived directly from high frequency observations through contiguous storms

AU - Jones, Timothy D.

AU - Chappell, Nick A.

AU - Tych, Wlodek

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - The first dynamic model of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export in streams derived directly from high frequency (sub-hourly) observations sampled at a regular interval through contiguous storms is presented. The optimal model, identified using the recently developed RIVC algorithm, captured the rapid dynamics of DOC load from 15-minute monitored rainfall with high simulation efficiencies and constrained uncertainty with a second-order (two-pathway) structure. Most of the DOC export in the four headwater basins studied was associated with the faster hydrometric pathway (also modelled in parallel), and was soon exhausted in the slower pathway. A delay in the DOC mobilisation became apparent as the ambient temperatures increased. These features of the component pathways were quantified in the dynamic response characteristics (DRCs) identified by RIVC. The model and associated DRCs are intended as a foundation for a better understanding of storm-related DOC dynamics and predictability, given the increasing availability of sub-hourly DOC concentration data.

AB - The first dynamic model of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export in streams derived directly from high frequency (sub-hourly) observations sampled at a regular interval through contiguous storms is presented. The optimal model, identified using the recently developed RIVC algorithm, captured the rapid dynamics of DOC load from 15-minute monitored rainfall with high simulation efficiencies and constrained uncertainty with a second-order (two-pathway) structure. Most of the DOC export in the four headwater basins studied was associated with the faster hydrometric pathway (also modelled in parallel), and was soon exhausted in the slower pathway. A delay in the DOC mobilisation became apparent as the ambient temperatures increased. These features of the component pathways were quantified in the dynamic response characteristics (DRCs) identified by RIVC. The model and associated DRCs are intended as a foundation for a better understanding of storm-related DOC dynamics and predictability, given the increasing availability of sub-hourly DOC concentration data.

U2 - 10.1021/es503506m

DO - 10.1021/es503506m

M3 - Journal article

VL - 48

SP - 13289

EP - 13297

JO - Environmental Science and Technology

JF - Environmental Science and Technology

SN - 0013-936X

IS - 22

ER -