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Images of educational practice: how school websites represent digital learning

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Images of educational practice : how school websites represent digital learning. / Crook, Charles; Lackovic, Natasa .

Handbook on digital learning for K-12 schools. ed. / Ann Marcus-Quinn; Triona Hourigan. Springer, 2016. p. 75-90.

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNChapter (peer-reviewed)

Harvard

Crook, C & Lackovic, N 2016, Images of educational practice: how school websites represent digital learning. in A Marcus-Quinn & T Hourigan (eds), Handbook on digital learning for K-12 schools. Springer, pp. 75-90. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33808-8_6

APA

Crook, C., & Lackovic, N. (2016). Images of educational practice: how school websites represent digital learning. In A. Marcus-Quinn, & T. Hourigan (Eds.), Handbook on digital learning for K-12 schools (pp. 75-90). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33808-8_6

Vancouver

Crook C, Lackovic N. Images of educational practice: how school websites represent digital learning. In Marcus-Quinn A, Hourigan T, editors, Handbook on digital learning for K-12 schools. Springer. 2016. p. 75-90 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-33808-8_6

Author

Crook, Charles ; Lackovic, Natasa . / Images of educational practice : how school websites represent digital learning. Handbook on digital learning for K-12 schools. editor / Ann Marcus-Quinn ; Triona Hourigan. Springer, 2016. pp. 75-90

Bibtex

@inbook{c74f1efb81904393926126cf88facdbd,
title = "Images of educational practice: how school websites represent digital learning",
abstract = "What does school life and learning look like? One way of addressing this question would be to consider the images that educational institutions employ to represent the activity of their students. In this chapter, we report the results of applying such an approach to 151 websites of English primary schools. They were randomly selected from a government database of such schools. Photographic images found on these sites were then classified into 18 base categories according to their principle content. Images of the school {\textquoteleft}environment{\textquoteright} (the building, classroom), {\textquoteleft}sport{\textquoteright} activities and {\textquoteleft}personality{\textquoteright} images of children (presenting individual or groups of children) dominated this corpus. The principle themes tended to show children variously involved in exercise, performance, visits to external sites or different forms of active inquiry. Involvement with any type of digital resources was found to be a very infrequently represented form of student activity. This low profile of digital engagements was reinforced by an audit of after-school clubs advertised on the websites which showed that less than 5 % of the clubs were technology-related. These findings are discussed in terms of a tension between the rhetoric and investment associated with technology-enhanced learning and the extent to which it is publically and visually celebrated by educational institutions.",
keywords = "images, School websites, Digital Culture",
author = "Charles Crook and Natasa Lackovic",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-33808-8_6",
language = "English",
isbn = "9783319338064 ",
pages = "75--90",
editor = "Ann Marcus-Quinn and Triona Hourigan",
booktitle = "Handbook on digital learning for K-12 schools",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Images of educational practice

T2 - how school websites represent digital learning

AU - Crook, Charles

AU - Lackovic, Natasa

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - What does school life and learning look like? One way of addressing this question would be to consider the images that educational institutions employ to represent the activity of their students. In this chapter, we report the results of applying such an approach to 151 websites of English primary schools. They were randomly selected from a government database of such schools. Photographic images found on these sites were then classified into 18 base categories according to their principle content. Images of the school ‘environment’ (the building, classroom), ‘sport’ activities and ‘personality’ images of children (presenting individual or groups of children) dominated this corpus. The principle themes tended to show children variously involved in exercise, performance, visits to external sites or different forms of active inquiry. Involvement with any type of digital resources was found to be a very infrequently represented form of student activity. This low profile of digital engagements was reinforced by an audit of after-school clubs advertised on the websites which showed that less than 5 % of the clubs were technology-related. These findings are discussed in terms of a tension between the rhetoric and investment associated with technology-enhanced learning and the extent to which it is publically and visually celebrated by educational institutions.

AB - What does school life and learning look like? One way of addressing this question would be to consider the images that educational institutions employ to represent the activity of their students. In this chapter, we report the results of applying such an approach to 151 websites of English primary schools. They were randomly selected from a government database of such schools. Photographic images found on these sites were then classified into 18 base categories according to their principle content. Images of the school ‘environment’ (the building, classroom), ‘sport’ activities and ‘personality’ images of children (presenting individual or groups of children) dominated this corpus. The principle themes tended to show children variously involved in exercise, performance, visits to external sites or different forms of active inquiry. Involvement with any type of digital resources was found to be a very infrequently represented form of student activity. This low profile of digital engagements was reinforced by an audit of after-school clubs advertised on the websites which showed that less than 5 % of the clubs were technology-related. These findings are discussed in terms of a tension between the rhetoric and investment associated with technology-enhanced learning and the extent to which it is publically and visually celebrated by educational institutions.

KW - images

KW - School websites

KW - Digital Culture

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-33808-8_6

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-33808-8_6

M3 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

SN - 9783319338064

SP - 75

EP - 90

BT - Handbook on digital learning for K-12 schools

A2 - Marcus-Quinn, Ann

A2 - Hourigan, Triona

PB - Springer

ER -