Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Managing to make markets

Electronic data

  • IMM_D_16_00218_Managing_to_Make_Markets_R4b_submitted

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Industrial Marketing Management. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Industrial Marketing Management, 67, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.indmarman.2017.07.001

    Accepted author manuscript, 489 KB, PDF-document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Managing to make markets: Marketization and the conceptualization work of strategic nets in the life science sector

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>19/07/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Industrial Marketing Management
Volume67
Number of pages18
Pages (from-to)52-69
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date19/07/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Abstract This paper presents one of the first studies to identify and explain the marketization work of a strategic net. Through a study of the Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst – a strategic net formed to support the marketization of Life Science Discoveries - we generate insights into the everyday work that makes marketization happen. Marketization is understood as the process that enables the conceptualisation, production and exchange of goods. Our findings focus on one specific form of marketization work found to be core to the strategic net: conceptualisation work. Three forms of conceptualisation work are identified: conceptualising actors' roles, conceptualising markets and conceptualising goods. These manifest as routinized, recursive practices. Our analysis reveals how these practices gather together multiple forms of scientific, technical and market knowledge to generate new market devices that transform market rules and conventions, and introduce new methods and instruments of valuation that change the market. In contrast to extant studies that claim a strategic net's activities influence markets; our findings position the conceptualisation work of the strategic net as constitutive of markets and the broader system of provision for ‘healthcare’ and ‘health futures’.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Industrial Marketing Management. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Industrial Marketing Management, 67, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.indmarman.2017.07.001