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  • Re´ve´sz et al accepted_Measuring cognitive task demands

    Rights statement: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/studies-in-second-language-acquisition/article/measuring-cognitive-task-demands-using-dual-task-methodology-subjective-self-ratings-and-expert-judgments/EB97A051BF3AC9B47DC05FD8FE197D48 The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Second Language Acquisition, 38 (4), pp 703-737 2016, © 2015 Cambridge University Press.

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  • Re´ve´sz et al accepted_Measuring cognitive task demands.2

    Rights statement: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/studies-in-second-language-acquisition/article/measuring-cognitive-task-demands-using-dual-task-methodology-subjective-self-ratings-and-expert-judgments/EB97A051BF3AC9B47DC05FD8FE197D48 The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Second Language Acquisition, 38 (4), pp 703-737 2016, © 2015 Cambridge University Press.

    Accepted author manuscript, 123 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

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Measuring cognitive task demands using dual task methodology, subjective self-ratings, and expert judgments: a validation study

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Measuring cognitive task demands using dual task methodology, subjective self-ratings, and expert judgments : a validation study. / Révész, Andrea; Michel, Marije; Gilabert, Roger.

In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, Vol. 38, No. 4, 12.2016, p. 703-737.

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Révész, Andrea ; Michel, Marije ; Gilabert, Roger. / Measuring cognitive task demands using dual task methodology, subjective self-ratings, and expert judgments : a validation study. In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition. 2016 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 703-737.

Bibtex

@article{27a7366ddf4046109be730d84603dda7,
title = "Measuring cognitive task demands using dual task methodology, subjective self-ratings, and expert judgments: a validation study",
abstract = "This study explored the usefulness of dual-task methodology, self-ratings, and expert judgements in assessing task-generated cognitive demands as a way to provide validity evidence for manipulations of task complexity. The participants were 96 students and 61 ESL teachers. The students, 48 English native speakers and 48 ESL speakers, carried out simple and complex versions of three oral tasks – a picture narrative, a map task, and a decision-making task. Half of the students completed the tasks under a dual task condition. The remaining half performed the tasks under a single task condition without a secondary task. Participants in the single condition were asked to rate their perceived mental effort and task difficulty. The ESL teachers provided expert judgments of anticipated mental effort and task difficulty along with explanations for their ratings via an online questionnaire. As predicted, the more complex task versions were found and judged to pose greater cognitive effort on most measures. ",
author = "Andrea R{\'e}v{\'e}sz and Marije Michel and Roger Gilabert",
note = "https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/studies-in-second-language-acquisition/article/measuring-cognitive-task-demands-using-dual-task-methodology-subjective-self-ratings-and-expert-judgments/EB97A051BF3AC9B47DC05FD8FE197D48 The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Second Language Acquisition, 38 (4), pp 703-737 2016, {\textcopyright} 2015 Cambridge University Press.",
year = "2016",
month = dec
doi = "10.1017/S0272263115000339",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "703--737",
journal = "Studies in Second Language Acquisition",
issn = "0272-2631",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measuring cognitive task demands using dual task methodology, subjective self-ratings, and expert judgments

T2 - a validation study

AU - Révész, Andrea

AU - Michel, Marije

AU - Gilabert, Roger

N1 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/studies-in-second-language-acquisition/article/measuring-cognitive-task-demands-using-dual-task-methodology-subjective-self-ratings-and-expert-judgments/EB97A051BF3AC9B47DC05FD8FE197D48 The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Second Language Acquisition, 38 (4), pp 703-737 2016, © 2015 Cambridge University Press.

PY - 2016/12

Y1 - 2016/12

N2 - This study explored the usefulness of dual-task methodology, self-ratings, and expert judgements in assessing task-generated cognitive demands as a way to provide validity evidence for manipulations of task complexity. The participants were 96 students and 61 ESL teachers. The students, 48 English native speakers and 48 ESL speakers, carried out simple and complex versions of three oral tasks – a picture narrative, a map task, and a decision-making task. Half of the students completed the tasks under a dual task condition. The remaining half performed the tasks under a single task condition without a secondary task. Participants in the single condition were asked to rate their perceived mental effort and task difficulty. The ESL teachers provided expert judgments of anticipated mental effort and task difficulty along with explanations for their ratings via an online questionnaire. As predicted, the more complex task versions were found and judged to pose greater cognitive effort on most measures.

AB - This study explored the usefulness of dual-task methodology, self-ratings, and expert judgements in assessing task-generated cognitive demands as a way to provide validity evidence for manipulations of task complexity. The participants were 96 students and 61 ESL teachers. The students, 48 English native speakers and 48 ESL speakers, carried out simple and complex versions of three oral tasks – a picture narrative, a map task, and a decision-making task. Half of the students completed the tasks under a dual task condition. The remaining half performed the tasks under a single task condition without a secondary task. Participants in the single condition were asked to rate their perceived mental effort and task difficulty. The ESL teachers provided expert judgments of anticipated mental effort and task difficulty along with explanations for their ratings via an online questionnaire. As predicted, the more complex task versions were found and judged to pose greater cognitive effort on most measures.

U2 - 10.1017/S0272263115000339

DO - 10.1017/S0272263115000339

M3 - Journal article

VL - 38

SP - 703

EP - 737

JO - Studies in Second Language Acquisition

JF - Studies in Second Language Acquisition

SN - 0272-2631

IS - 4

ER -