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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Production Research on 13/11/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00207543.2017.1401245

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On the Beat of the Drum: Improving the Flow Shop Performance of the Drum-Buffer-Rope Scheduling Mechanism

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On the Beat of the Drum : Improving the Flow Shop Performance of the Drum-Buffer-Rope Scheduling Mechanism. / Thurer, Matthias; Stevenson, Mark.

In: International Journal of Production Research, Vol. 56, No. 9, 2018, p. 3294-3305.

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@article{1e3e2aeeafe44137acc9e5912bb33649,
title = "On the Beat of the Drum: Improving the Flow Shop Performance of the Drum-Buffer-Rope Scheduling Mechanism",
abstract = "One of the main elements of the theory of constraints is its Drum–Buffer–Rope (DBR) scheduling (or release) mechanism that controls the release of jobs to the system. Jobs are not released directly to the shop floor – they are withheld in a backlog and released in accordance with the output rate of the bottleneck (i.e. the drum). The sequence in which jobs are considered for release from the backlog is determined by the schedule of the drum, which also determines in which order jobs are processed or dispatched on the shop floor. In the DBR literature, the focus is on the urgency of jobs and the same procedure is used both for backlog sequencing and dispatching. In this study, we explore the potential of using different combinations of rules for sequencing and dispatching to improve DBR performance. Based on controlled simulation experiments in a pure and general flow shop we demonstrate that, although the original procedure works well in a pure flow shop, it becomes dysfunctional in a general flow shop where job routings vary. Performance can be significantly enhanced by switching from a focus on urgency to a focus on the shortest bottleneck processing time during periods of high load.",
keywords = "drum–Buffer–Rope, theory of constraints, order release, dispatching, flow shop",
author = "Matthias Thurer and Mark Stevenson",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Production Research on 13/11/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00207543.2017.1401245",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1080/00207543.2017.1401245",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "3294--3305",
journal = "International Journal of Production Research",
issn = "0020-7543",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - On the Beat of the Drum

T2 - Improving the Flow Shop Performance of the Drum-Buffer-Rope Scheduling Mechanism

AU - Thurer, Matthias

AU - Stevenson, Mark

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Production Research on 13/11/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00207543.2017.1401245

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - One of the main elements of the theory of constraints is its Drum–Buffer–Rope (DBR) scheduling (or release) mechanism that controls the release of jobs to the system. Jobs are not released directly to the shop floor – they are withheld in a backlog and released in accordance with the output rate of the bottleneck (i.e. the drum). The sequence in which jobs are considered for release from the backlog is determined by the schedule of the drum, which also determines in which order jobs are processed or dispatched on the shop floor. In the DBR literature, the focus is on the urgency of jobs and the same procedure is used both for backlog sequencing and dispatching. In this study, we explore the potential of using different combinations of rules for sequencing and dispatching to improve DBR performance. Based on controlled simulation experiments in a pure and general flow shop we demonstrate that, although the original procedure works well in a pure flow shop, it becomes dysfunctional in a general flow shop where job routings vary. Performance can be significantly enhanced by switching from a focus on urgency to a focus on the shortest bottleneck processing time during periods of high load.

AB - One of the main elements of the theory of constraints is its Drum–Buffer–Rope (DBR) scheduling (or release) mechanism that controls the release of jobs to the system. Jobs are not released directly to the shop floor – they are withheld in a backlog and released in accordance with the output rate of the bottleneck (i.e. the drum). The sequence in which jobs are considered for release from the backlog is determined by the schedule of the drum, which also determines in which order jobs are processed or dispatched on the shop floor. In the DBR literature, the focus is on the urgency of jobs and the same procedure is used both for backlog sequencing and dispatching. In this study, we explore the potential of using different combinations of rules for sequencing and dispatching to improve DBR performance. Based on controlled simulation experiments in a pure and general flow shop we demonstrate that, although the original procedure works well in a pure flow shop, it becomes dysfunctional in a general flow shop where job routings vary. Performance can be significantly enhanced by switching from a focus on urgency to a focus on the shortest bottleneck processing time during periods of high load.

KW - drum–Buffer–Rope

KW - theory of constraints

KW - order release

KW - dispatching

KW - flow shop

U2 - 10.1080/00207543.2017.1401245

DO - 10.1080/00207543.2017.1401245

M3 - Journal article

VL - 56

SP - 3294

EP - 3305

JO - International Journal of Production Research

JF - International Journal of Production Research

SN - 0020-7543

IS - 9

ER -