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A comparative phylogenomic analysis of peste des petits ruminants virus isolated from wild and unusual hosts

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/10/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Molecular Biology Reports
Issue number5
Volume46
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)5587-5593
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date17/07/19
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) infects a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants, and occasionally unusual hosts such as camel, cattle and pig. Given their broad host-spectrum and disease endemicity in several developing countries, it is imperative to elucidate the viral evolutionary insights for their dynamic pathobiology and differential host-selection. For this purpose, a dataset of all available (n = 37) PPRV sequences originating from wild and unusual hosts was composed and in silico analysed. Compared to domestic small ruminant strains of same geographical region, phylogenomic and residue analysis of PPRV sequences originating from wild and unusual hosts revealed a close relationship between strains. A lack of obvious difference among the studied sequences and deduced residues suggests that these are the host factors that may play a role in their susceptibility to PPRV infection, immune response, pathogenesis, excretion patterns and potential clinical signs or resistance to clinical disease. Summarizing together, the comparative analysis enhances our understanding towards molecular epidemiology of the PPRV in wild and unusual hosts for appropriate intervention strategies particularly at livestock-wildlife interface.

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The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11033-019-04973-7