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  • LRP_2018_50_R2_Manuscript_vADM

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Long Range Planning. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Long Range Planning, 54, 5, 2021 DOI: doi.org/10.1016/j.lrp.2020.101991

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A motivation and ability perspective on engagement in emerging digital technologies: The case of Internet of Things solutions

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Article number101991
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>31/10/2021
<mark>Journal</mark>Long Range Planning
Issue number5
Volume54
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date24/03/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

In this study, we advance two mechanisms that lead firms to engage in emerging digital technologies, namely, the dominant coalition's motivation and its ability to deploy the resources needed to pursue such motivation. Building on the performance and strategic development, and on board capital literature streams, we construe prior economic performance as a proxy of the firm's motivation, and human and social board capital as proxies of the firm's ability, analyzing their effect on adding emerging digital technologies, such as Internet of Things solutions, to the firm's resource base. Longitudinal analyses on a panel of Fortune 500 manufacturing firms between 2002 and 2012 reveal that these mechanisms highlight two important aspects of firm influence that can shape its digital technology behavior, explaining the heterogeneity and variability in firms engaging in emerging digital technologies.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Long Range Planning. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Long Range Planning, 54, 5, 2021 DOI: doi.org/10.1016/j.lrp.2020.101991