Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > A Non-Destructive, Tuneable Method to Isolate L...

Electronic data

  • microorganisms-09-00680-v2

    Final published version, 4.51 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

A Non-Destructive, Tuneable Method to Isolate Live Cells for High-Speed AFM Analysis

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

A Non-Destructive, Tuneable Method to Isolate Live Cells for High-Speed AFM Analysis. / Evans, Christopher; Baldock, Sara; Hardy, John; Payton, Oliver; Picco, Loren; Allen, Michael.

In: Microorganisms , Vol. 9, No. 4, 680, 25.03.2021.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Evans, Christopher ; Baldock, Sara ; Hardy, John ; Payton, Oliver ; Picco, Loren ; Allen, Michael. / A Non-Destructive, Tuneable Method to Isolate Live Cells for High-Speed AFM Analysis. In: Microorganisms . 2021 ; Vol. 9, No. 4.

Bibtex

@article{53a75345ad924110a9f59fa8ca45b42b,
title = "A Non-Destructive, Tuneable Method to Isolate Live Cells for High-Speed AFM Analysis",
abstract = "Suitable immobilisation of microorganisms and single cells is key for high-resolution topographical imaging and study of mechanical properties with atomic force microscopy (AFM) under physiologically relevant conditions. Sample preparation techniques must be able to withstand the forces exerted by the Z range-limited cantilever tip, and not negatively affect the sample surface for data acquisition. Here, we describe an inherently flexible methodology, utilising the high-resolution three-dimensional based printing technique of multiphoton polymerisation to rapidly generate bespoke arrays for cellular AFM analysis. As an example, we present data collected from live Emiliania huxleyi cells, unicellular microalgae, imaged by contact mode High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy (HS-AFM), including one cell that was imaged continuously for over 90 min.",
keywords = "high-speed, atomic force microscopy, microalgae, microbe, immobilization, multiphoton polymerization, 3D printing",
author = "Christopher Evans and Sara Baldock and John Hardy and Oliver Payton and Loren Picco and Michael Allen",
year = "2021",
month = mar,
day = "25",
doi = "10.3390/microorganisms9040680",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "Microorganisms ",
issn = "2076-2607",
publisher = "MDPI - Open Access Publishing",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Non-Destructive, Tuneable Method to Isolate Live Cells for High-Speed AFM Analysis

AU - Evans, Christopher

AU - Baldock, Sara

AU - Hardy, John

AU - Payton, Oliver

AU - Picco, Loren

AU - Allen, Michael

PY - 2021/3/25

Y1 - 2021/3/25

N2 - Suitable immobilisation of microorganisms and single cells is key for high-resolution topographical imaging and study of mechanical properties with atomic force microscopy (AFM) under physiologically relevant conditions. Sample preparation techniques must be able to withstand the forces exerted by the Z range-limited cantilever tip, and not negatively affect the sample surface for data acquisition. Here, we describe an inherently flexible methodology, utilising the high-resolution three-dimensional based printing technique of multiphoton polymerisation to rapidly generate bespoke arrays for cellular AFM analysis. As an example, we present data collected from live Emiliania huxleyi cells, unicellular microalgae, imaged by contact mode High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy (HS-AFM), including one cell that was imaged continuously for over 90 min.

AB - Suitable immobilisation of microorganisms and single cells is key for high-resolution topographical imaging and study of mechanical properties with atomic force microscopy (AFM) under physiologically relevant conditions. Sample preparation techniques must be able to withstand the forces exerted by the Z range-limited cantilever tip, and not negatively affect the sample surface for data acquisition. Here, we describe an inherently flexible methodology, utilising the high-resolution three-dimensional based printing technique of multiphoton polymerisation to rapidly generate bespoke arrays for cellular AFM analysis. As an example, we present data collected from live Emiliania huxleyi cells, unicellular microalgae, imaged by contact mode High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy (HS-AFM), including one cell that was imaged continuously for over 90 min.

KW - high-speed

KW - atomic force microscopy

KW - microalgae

KW - microbe

KW - immobilization

KW - multiphoton polymerization

KW - 3D printing

U2 - 10.3390/microorganisms9040680

DO - 10.3390/microorganisms9040680

M3 - Journal article

VL - 9

JO - Microorganisms

JF - Microorganisms

SN - 2076-2607

IS - 4

M1 - 680

ER -