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Accounting technologies and sustainability assessment models

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Accounting technologies and sustainability assessment models. / Bebbington, Jan; Frame, B.

In: Ecological Economics, Vol. 61, No. 2-3, 01.03.2007, p. 224-236.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

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Bebbington J, Frame B. Accounting technologies and sustainability assessment models. Ecological Economics. 2007 Mar 1;61(2-3):224-236. Epub 2006 Dec 22. doi: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2006.10.021

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Bebbington, Jan ; Frame, B. / Accounting technologies and sustainability assessment models. In: Ecological Economics. 2007 ; Vol. 61, No. 2-3. pp. 224-236.

Bibtex

@article{f9619d0f66c74b4e86d59dbab4ee478e,
title = "Accounting technologies and sustainability assessment models",
abstract = "Within ecological economics there is recognition of the need for new approaches to decision-making to support sustainable development initiatives. There is an increasing acknowledgement of the limitations of cost-benefit analysis approaches as a measure of the (un)sustainability of organizational activities. These are viewed as particularly inappropriate within the participatory settings that sustainable development proponents seek to foster. They also fail to deal with the highly contested nature of sustainable development discourse in contemporary pluralist democracies. While advances have been made in the field of multicriteria decision-making, there is still a relative dearth of versatile models that accommodate monetization in a way that recognizes the limits of calculative technologies. This article introduces readers to developments within the accounting discipline designed to support sustainable development decision-making and evaluation. In particular, it proposes sustainability assessment models as a viable alternative to cost-benefit analysis. Sustainability assessment models are based on an inter-disciplinary approach that recognizes the need for {"}accountings{"} that facilitate more participatory forms of decision-making and accountability. As such, they address many of the weaknesses in current approaches to cost-benefit analysis. The authors' first experiences with sustainability assessment models were with BP and the United Kingdom oil and gas sector, where models were developed as a means of making previously external costs more central to organizational decision-making. Later work has included exploration of a range of decision-making situations in private and public sector organizations in both the United Kingdom and New Zealand. This has involved more explicit attention to plural values and issues of participation, dialogue and democracy. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "full cost accounting, sustainable development, sustainability assessment models, cost-benefit analysis, dialogic accounting, COST-BENEFIT-ANALYSIS, POST-NORMAL SCIENCE, ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS, DECISION-MAKING, CONTINGENT VALUATION, CRITIQUE, CONSTRUCTION, CHALLENGE, POLITICS, MARKETS",
author = "Jan Bebbington and B Frame",
year = "2007",
month = mar,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ecolecon.2006.10.021",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "224--236",
journal = "Ecological Economics",
issn = "0921-8009",
publisher = "Elsevier Science B.V.",
number = "2-3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accounting technologies and sustainability assessment models

AU - Bebbington, Jan

AU - Frame, B

PY - 2007/3/1

Y1 - 2007/3/1

N2 - Within ecological economics there is recognition of the need for new approaches to decision-making to support sustainable development initiatives. There is an increasing acknowledgement of the limitations of cost-benefit analysis approaches as a measure of the (un)sustainability of organizational activities. These are viewed as particularly inappropriate within the participatory settings that sustainable development proponents seek to foster. They also fail to deal with the highly contested nature of sustainable development discourse in contemporary pluralist democracies. While advances have been made in the field of multicriteria decision-making, there is still a relative dearth of versatile models that accommodate monetization in a way that recognizes the limits of calculative technologies. This article introduces readers to developments within the accounting discipline designed to support sustainable development decision-making and evaluation. In particular, it proposes sustainability assessment models as a viable alternative to cost-benefit analysis. Sustainability assessment models are based on an inter-disciplinary approach that recognizes the need for "accountings" that facilitate more participatory forms of decision-making and accountability. As such, they address many of the weaknesses in current approaches to cost-benefit analysis. The authors' first experiences with sustainability assessment models were with BP and the United Kingdom oil and gas sector, where models were developed as a means of making previously external costs more central to organizational decision-making. Later work has included exploration of a range of decision-making situations in private and public sector organizations in both the United Kingdom and New Zealand. This has involved more explicit attention to plural values and issues of participation, dialogue and democracy. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

AB - Within ecological economics there is recognition of the need for new approaches to decision-making to support sustainable development initiatives. There is an increasing acknowledgement of the limitations of cost-benefit analysis approaches as a measure of the (un)sustainability of organizational activities. These are viewed as particularly inappropriate within the participatory settings that sustainable development proponents seek to foster. They also fail to deal with the highly contested nature of sustainable development discourse in contemporary pluralist democracies. While advances have been made in the field of multicriteria decision-making, there is still a relative dearth of versatile models that accommodate monetization in a way that recognizes the limits of calculative technologies. This article introduces readers to developments within the accounting discipline designed to support sustainable development decision-making and evaluation. In particular, it proposes sustainability assessment models as a viable alternative to cost-benefit analysis. Sustainability assessment models are based on an inter-disciplinary approach that recognizes the need for "accountings" that facilitate more participatory forms of decision-making and accountability. As such, they address many of the weaknesses in current approaches to cost-benefit analysis. The authors' first experiences with sustainability assessment models were with BP and the United Kingdom oil and gas sector, where models were developed as a means of making previously external costs more central to organizational decision-making. Later work has included exploration of a range of decision-making situations in private and public sector organizations in both the United Kingdom and New Zealand. This has involved more explicit attention to plural values and issues of participation, dialogue and democracy. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KW - full cost accounting

KW - sustainable development

KW - sustainability assessment models

KW - cost-benefit analysis

KW - dialogic accounting

KW - COST-BENEFIT-ANALYSIS

KW - POST-NORMAL SCIENCE

KW - ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS

KW - DECISION-MAKING

KW - CONTINGENT VALUATION

KW - CRITIQUE

KW - CONSTRUCTION

KW - CHALLENGE

KW - POLITICS

KW - MARKETS

U2 - 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2006.10.021

DO - 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2006.10.021

M3 - Journal article

VL - 61

SP - 224

EP - 236

JO - Ecological Economics

JF - Ecological Economics

SN - 0921-8009

IS - 2-3

ER -