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  • BioControl_2016_penultimate

    Rights statement: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10526-016-9767-7

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Additive and synergistic interactions amongst Orius laevigatus (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae), entomopathogens and azadirachtin for controlling western flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>02/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>BioControl
Issue number1
Volume62
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)85-95
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date7/10/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This study evaluated the efficacy of the foliage-dwelling predator Orius laevigatus, soil applied entomopathogens and azadirachtin alone and in combinations for controlling western flower thrips (WFT). Evaluated products were Nemastar®Steinernema carpocapsae (E-nema) and O. laevigatus (Re-natur), Metarhizium anisopliae isolate ICIPE-69 and NeemAzal-T (azadirachtin) (Trifolio). Efficacy against WFT was significantly improved by combined treatments achieving 62–97 % reduction in WFT emergence, compared to 45–74 % in single treatments, and interactions resulted in two synergistic and eight additive responses. Metarhizium-based treatments reduced WFT survival by 93–99.6 % when late mortality by mycosis was considered. Halving the number of released predators did not significantly reduce efficacy (86–96 vs. 76–88 % thrips reduction), and when Orius was introduced to target L1 of WFT, 96–98 % reduction was achieved while only 71–89 % for L2. Early release of O. laevigatus and combination with soil application of NeemAzal-T and/or entomopathogens can be a successful and reliable biocontrol strategy for WFT.

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The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10526-016-9767-7