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  • EEB-S-20-00899-5-34

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Environmental and Experimental Botany. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Environmental and Experimental Botany, 179, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2020.104233

    Accepted author manuscript, 1.14 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 12/08/21

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Aluminum-induced stomatal closure is related to low root hydraulic conductance and high ABA accumulation

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Article number104233
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/11/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Environmental and Experimental Botany
Volume179
Number of pages10
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date12/08/20
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Many studies ask how aluminum (Al) reduces the root growth, but as Al is mostly retained in the root system, physiological explanations for the also expected Al-induced decrease in stomatal conductance (gs) are unclear, mainly in well-watered conditions. We exposed tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum) to 0, 25, 50 and 100 μM Al in nutrient solution to investigate whether Al impairs root hydraulic conductance (Lpr), affecting leaf water potential (Ψleaf) and possibly inducing abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in roots and/or leaves. We also measured ABA delivery rate, xylem sap pH and the root/leaf area ratio in order to explain the low gs in plants exposed to Al. Declines in Lpr and gs were proportional to the increase in Al concentration, and all Al treatments similarly decreased Ψleaf, indicating the plant's attempt to reduce water loss through transpiration while accumulating more ABA. Despite Al-induced increases in root ABA, the root-to-shoot delivery of ABA did not enhance, but Al caused root xylem sap alkalization. Despite the stability of root/leaf area ratio across a range of Al concentrations (0, 25 and 50 μM Al), the leaf hydration and stomatal opening was not conserved. Here we provide the first evidence that decreases in Lpr and increases in ABA might explain Al-induced stomatal closure. © 2020 Elsevier B.V.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Environmental and Experimental Botany. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Environmental and Experimental Botany, 179, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2020.104233