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Breaking the mould: Achieving high volume production output with additive manufacturing

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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Breaking the mould : Achieving high volume production output with additive manufacturing. / Huang, Yuan; Eyers, Daniel; Stevenson, Mark; Thurer, Matthias.

In: International Journal of Operations and Production Management, Vol. 41, No. 12, 01.12.2021, p. 1844-1851.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Huang, Y, Eyers, D, Stevenson, M & Thurer, M 2021, 'Breaking the mould: Achieving high volume production output with additive manufacturing', International Journal of Operations and Production Management, vol. 41, no. 12, pp. 1844-1851. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJOPM-05-2021-0350

APA

Huang, Y., Eyers, D., Stevenson, M., & Thurer, M. (2021). Breaking the mould: Achieving high volume production output with additive manufacturing. International Journal of Operations and Production Management, 41(12), 1844-1851. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJOPM-05-2021-0350

Vancouver

Huang Y, Eyers D, Stevenson M, Thurer M. Breaking the mould: Achieving high volume production output with additive manufacturing. International Journal of Operations and Production Management. 2021 Dec 1;41(12):1844-1851. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJOPM-05-2021-0350

Author

Huang, Yuan ; Eyers, Daniel ; Stevenson, Mark ; Thurer, Matthias. / Breaking the mould : Achieving high volume production output with additive manufacturing. In: International Journal of Operations and Production Management. 2021 ; Vol. 41, No. 12. pp. 1844-1851.

Bibtex

@article{dccbe37cfeb14873b7c4a0e8ef33b54e,
title = "Breaking the mould: Achieving high volume production output with additive manufacturing",
abstract = "PurposeThe study aims to examine a discrepant industrial case that demonstrates how to achieve economies of scale with additive manufacturing (AM), thereby expanding the scope of AM beyond high-variety, customised production contexts.Design/methodology/approachAbductive reasoning is applied to analyse a case of using AM to compete with conventional production, winning a contract to supply 7,700,000 products. Comparing this case to existing theories and contemporary practices reveals new research directions and practical insights.FindingsEconomies of scale were realised through a combination of technological innovation and the adoption of operations management practices atypical of AM shops (e.g. design for volume, low-cost resource deployment and material flow optimisation). The former improved AM process parameters in terms of time, cost and dependability; the latter improved the entire manufacturing system, including non-AM operations/resources. This system-wide improvement has been largely overlooked in the literature, where AM is typically viewed as a disruptive technology that simplifies manufacturing processes and shortens supply chains.Originality/valueIt is empirically shown that an AM shop can achieve economies of scale and compete with conventional manufacturing in high-volume, standardised production contexts.",
keywords = "Additive Manufacturing, Economies of scale, 3D printing, COVID-19",
author = "Yuan Huang and Daniel Eyers and Mark Stevenson and Matthias Thurer",
note = "This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited. ",
year = "2021",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1108/IJOPM-05-2021-0350",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "1844--1851",
journal = "International Journal of Operations and Production Management",
issn = "0144-3577",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Breaking the mould

T2 - Achieving high volume production output with additive manufacturing

AU - Huang, Yuan

AU - Eyers, Daniel

AU - Stevenson, Mark

AU - Thurer, Matthias

N1 - This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

PY - 2021/12/1

Y1 - 2021/12/1

N2 - PurposeThe study aims to examine a discrepant industrial case that demonstrates how to achieve economies of scale with additive manufacturing (AM), thereby expanding the scope of AM beyond high-variety, customised production contexts.Design/methodology/approachAbductive reasoning is applied to analyse a case of using AM to compete with conventional production, winning a contract to supply 7,700,000 products. Comparing this case to existing theories and contemporary practices reveals new research directions and practical insights.FindingsEconomies of scale were realised through a combination of technological innovation and the adoption of operations management practices atypical of AM shops (e.g. design for volume, low-cost resource deployment and material flow optimisation). The former improved AM process parameters in terms of time, cost and dependability; the latter improved the entire manufacturing system, including non-AM operations/resources. This system-wide improvement has been largely overlooked in the literature, where AM is typically viewed as a disruptive technology that simplifies manufacturing processes and shortens supply chains.Originality/valueIt is empirically shown that an AM shop can achieve economies of scale and compete with conventional manufacturing in high-volume, standardised production contexts.

AB - PurposeThe study aims to examine a discrepant industrial case that demonstrates how to achieve economies of scale with additive manufacturing (AM), thereby expanding the scope of AM beyond high-variety, customised production contexts.Design/methodology/approachAbductive reasoning is applied to analyse a case of using AM to compete with conventional production, winning a contract to supply 7,700,000 products. Comparing this case to existing theories and contemporary practices reveals new research directions and practical insights.FindingsEconomies of scale were realised through a combination of technological innovation and the adoption of operations management practices atypical of AM shops (e.g. design for volume, low-cost resource deployment and material flow optimisation). The former improved AM process parameters in terms of time, cost and dependability; the latter improved the entire manufacturing system, including non-AM operations/resources. This system-wide improvement has been largely overlooked in the literature, where AM is typically viewed as a disruptive technology that simplifies manufacturing processes and shortens supply chains.Originality/valueIt is empirically shown that an AM shop can achieve economies of scale and compete with conventional manufacturing in high-volume, standardised production contexts.

KW - Additive Manufacturing

KW - Economies of scale

KW - 3D printing

KW - COVID-19

U2 - 10.1108/IJOPM-05-2021-0350

DO - 10.1108/IJOPM-05-2021-0350

M3 - Journal article

VL - 41

SP - 1844

EP - 1851

JO - International Journal of Operations and Production Management

JF - International Journal of Operations and Production Management

SN - 0144-3577

IS - 12

ER -