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  • Duckett_et_al_2014_Sociologia_Ruralis

    Rights statement: © 2014 The Authors. Sociologia Ruralis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society for Rural Sociology. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Sociologia Ruralis, Vol 55, Number 4, October 2015

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Can policy be risk-based?: the cultural theory of risk and the case of livestock disease containment

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Can policy be risk-based? the cultural theory of risk and the case of livestock disease containment. / Duckett, Dominic; Wynne, Brian; Christley, Robert M.; Heathwaite, Louise; Mort, Maggie; Austin, Zoe; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Latham, Sophia; Alcock, Ruth; Haygarth, Philip.

In: Sociologia Ruralis, Vol. 55, No. 4, 10.2015, p. 379-399.

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@article{11b4a381f2a94f1190606a5fb62c1569,
title = "Can policy be risk-based?: the cultural theory of risk and the case of livestock disease containment",
abstract = "This article explores the nature of calls for risk-based policy present in expert discourse from a cultural theory perspective. Semi-structured interviews with professionals engaged in the research and management of livestock disease control provide the data for a reading proposing that the real basis of policy relating to socio-technical hazards is deeply political and cannot be purified through {\textquoteleft}escape routes{\textquoteright} to objectivity. Scientists and risk managers are shown calling, on the one hand, for risk-based policy approaches while on the other acknowledging a range of policy drivers outside the scope of conventional quantitative risk analysis including group interests, eventualities such as outbreaks, historical antecedents, emergent scientific advances and other contingencies. Calls for risk-based policy are presented, following cultural theory, as ideals connected to a reductionist epistemology and serving particular professional interests over others rather than as realistic proposals for a paradigm shift.",
keywords = "risk based policy, livestock disease control, cultural theory, expert discourse, sociotechnical hazards",
author = "Dominic Duckett and Brian Wynne and Christley, {Robert M.} and Louise Heathwaite and Maggie Mort and Zoe Austin and Wastling, {Jonathan M.} and Sophia Latham and Ruth Alcock and Philip Haygarth",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2014 The Authors. Sociologia Ruralis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society for Rural Sociology. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Sociologia Ruralis, Vol 55, Number 4, October 2015 ",
year = "2015",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1111/soru.12064",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "379--399",
journal = "Sociologia Ruralis",
issn = "0038-0199",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can policy be risk-based?

T2 - the cultural theory of risk and the case of livestock disease containment

AU - Duckett, Dominic

AU - Wynne, Brian

AU - Christley, Robert M.

AU - Heathwaite, Louise

AU - Mort, Maggie

AU - Austin, Zoe

AU - Wastling, Jonathan M.

AU - Latham, Sophia

AU - Alcock, Ruth

AU - Haygarth, Philip

N1 - © 2014 The Authors. Sociologia Ruralis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society for Rural Sociology. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Sociologia Ruralis, Vol 55, Number 4, October 2015

PY - 2015/10

Y1 - 2015/10

N2 - This article explores the nature of calls for risk-based policy present in expert discourse from a cultural theory perspective. Semi-structured interviews with professionals engaged in the research and management of livestock disease control provide the data for a reading proposing that the real basis of policy relating to socio-technical hazards is deeply political and cannot be purified through ‘escape routes’ to objectivity. Scientists and risk managers are shown calling, on the one hand, for risk-based policy approaches while on the other acknowledging a range of policy drivers outside the scope of conventional quantitative risk analysis including group interests, eventualities such as outbreaks, historical antecedents, emergent scientific advances and other contingencies. Calls for risk-based policy are presented, following cultural theory, as ideals connected to a reductionist epistemology and serving particular professional interests over others rather than as realistic proposals for a paradigm shift.

AB - This article explores the nature of calls for risk-based policy present in expert discourse from a cultural theory perspective. Semi-structured interviews with professionals engaged in the research and management of livestock disease control provide the data for a reading proposing that the real basis of policy relating to socio-technical hazards is deeply political and cannot be purified through ‘escape routes’ to objectivity. Scientists and risk managers are shown calling, on the one hand, for risk-based policy approaches while on the other acknowledging a range of policy drivers outside the scope of conventional quantitative risk analysis including group interests, eventualities such as outbreaks, historical antecedents, emergent scientific advances and other contingencies. Calls for risk-based policy are presented, following cultural theory, as ideals connected to a reductionist epistemology and serving particular professional interests over others rather than as realistic proposals for a paradigm shift.

KW - risk based policy

KW - livestock disease control

KW - cultural theory

KW - expert discourse

KW - sociotechnical hazards

U2 - 10.1111/soru.12064

DO - 10.1111/soru.12064

M3 - Journal article

VL - 55

SP - 379

EP - 399

JO - Sociologia Ruralis

JF - Sociologia Ruralis

SN - 0038-0199

IS - 4

ER -