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Converging Experiences, Converging Audiences: An Analysis of Doctor Who on Twitch

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Converging Experiences, Converging Audiences : An Analysis of Doctor Who on Twitch. / Jacobs, Naomi; Booth, Paul.

In: Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, 11.12.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Jacobs, N & Booth, P 2020, 'Converging Experiences, Converging Audiences: An Analysis of Doctor Who on Twitch', Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies. https://doi.org/10.1177/1354856520976447

APA

Jacobs, N., & Booth, P. (2020). Converging Experiences, Converging Audiences: An Analysis of Doctor Who on Twitch. Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies. https://doi.org/10.1177/1354856520976447

Vancouver

Jacobs N, Booth P. Converging Experiences, Converging Audiences: An Analysis of Doctor Who on Twitch. Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies. 2020 Dec 11. https://doi.org/10.1177/1354856520976447

Author

Jacobs, Naomi ; Booth, Paul. / Converging Experiences, Converging Audiences : An Analysis of Doctor Who on Twitch. In: Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies. 2020.

Bibtex

@article{8fabe172ad3d42dfaadbe6f2d2ce54fa,
title = "Converging Experiences, Converging Audiences: An Analysis of Doctor Who on Twitch",
abstract = "While primarily considered to be a platform for livestreaming of video games, Twitch has recently diversified into streaming archival television content. In 2018 and 2019, episodes of the television show Doctor Who, originally aired between 1963 and 1989, were shown on the service, which also provides a synchronous chat function for viewers to communicate with each other as they watch.This article examines this phenomenon through conducting qualitative and quantitative surveys with a segment of the viewership of these streams in order to uncover a diversity of age and experience with the content that exposes a convergence of viewership. Results indicate that the convergence of audiences and novel affordances of the service provide opportunities for new experiences and forms of interaction, both with the media content and with other viewers. The live, synchronous nature of the broadcast is a key feature, and while some viewers found having less control over their viewing experience disconcerting, it resulted in different watching and production practices. This included the creation of memetic content which was shared with the wider community of fans beyond those watching the stream. We argue that new forms of communal watching are enabled by digital convergence and emerging technology platforms and services. These lead to new shared media experiences and outcomes.",
author = "Naomi Jacobs and Paul Booth",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
day = "11",
doi = "10.1177/1354856520976447",
language = "English",
journal = "Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies",
issn = "1354-8565",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Converging Experiences, Converging Audiences

T2 - An Analysis of Doctor Who on Twitch

AU - Jacobs, Naomi

AU - Booth, Paul

PY - 2020/12/11

Y1 - 2020/12/11

N2 - While primarily considered to be a platform for livestreaming of video games, Twitch has recently diversified into streaming archival television content. In 2018 and 2019, episodes of the television show Doctor Who, originally aired between 1963 and 1989, were shown on the service, which also provides a synchronous chat function for viewers to communicate with each other as they watch.This article examines this phenomenon through conducting qualitative and quantitative surveys with a segment of the viewership of these streams in order to uncover a diversity of age and experience with the content that exposes a convergence of viewership. Results indicate that the convergence of audiences and novel affordances of the service provide opportunities for new experiences and forms of interaction, both with the media content and with other viewers. The live, synchronous nature of the broadcast is a key feature, and while some viewers found having less control over their viewing experience disconcerting, it resulted in different watching and production practices. This included the creation of memetic content which was shared with the wider community of fans beyond those watching the stream. We argue that new forms of communal watching are enabled by digital convergence and emerging technology platforms and services. These lead to new shared media experiences and outcomes.

AB - While primarily considered to be a platform for livestreaming of video games, Twitch has recently diversified into streaming archival television content. In 2018 and 2019, episodes of the television show Doctor Who, originally aired between 1963 and 1989, were shown on the service, which also provides a synchronous chat function for viewers to communicate with each other as they watch.This article examines this phenomenon through conducting qualitative and quantitative surveys with a segment of the viewership of these streams in order to uncover a diversity of age and experience with the content that exposes a convergence of viewership. Results indicate that the convergence of audiences and novel affordances of the service provide opportunities for new experiences and forms of interaction, both with the media content and with other viewers. The live, synchronous nature of the broadcast is a key feature, and while some viewers found having less control over their viewing experience disconcerting, it resulted in different watching and production practices. This included the creation of memetic content which was shared with the wider community of fans beyond those watching the stream. We argue that new forms of communal watching are enabled by digital convergence and emerging technology platforms and services. These lead to new shared media experiences and outcomes.

U2 - 10.1177/1354856520976447

DO - 10.1177/1354856520976447

M3 - Journal article

JO - Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies

JF - Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies

SN - 1354-8565

ER -