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Correspondence between self- and good-manager descriptions: examining stability and change over four decades

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>09/2015
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Management
Issue number6
Volume41
Number of pages29
Pages (from-to)1745-1773
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date28/11/12
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Newly collected data from samples obtained from two different populations—undergraduate business students and part-time (i.e., evening) MBA students—were compared with data from samples obtained from the same two populations during each of the three previous decades (N = 1,818) to examine the correspondence between self-descriptions and descriptions of a “good manager.” Both stability and change in the correspondence between self- and good-manager descriptions were predicted. Providing strong support for stability, the correspondence between self- and good-manager descriptions was greater for men than women for all data combined as well as for data collected at each point in time. However, despite changes in women’s status and in views of effective leadership across the four decades in which data were collected, the correspondence between self- and good-manager descriptions exhibited a lack of support for consistent change over time for women and men considered separately. Implications for the nature of the linkages among sex, gender, and leadership as well as implications for individuals and organizations are discussed.