Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Design with care
View graph of relations

Design with care

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Design with care. / Cheverst, Keith; Clarke, Karen; Cobb, Sue et al.

In: New Technology in the Human Services, Vol. 14, No. 1 & 2, 2001, p. 39-47.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Cheverst, K, Clarke, K, Cobb, S, Hemmings, T, Kember, S, Mitchell, K, Phillips, P, Procter, R, Rodden, T & Rouncefield, M 2001, 'Design with care', New Technology in the Human Services, vol. 14, no. 1 & 2, pp. 39-47. <http://www.southampton.ac.uk/chst/projects/nths_archive/abv14125.htm>

APA

Cheverst, K., Clarke, K., Cobb, S., Hemmings, T., Kember, S., Mitchell, K., Phillips, P., Procter, R., Rodden, T., & Rouncefield, M. (2001). Design with care. New Technology in the Human Services, 14(1 & 2), 39-47. http://www.southampton.ac.uk/chst/projects/nths_archive/abv14125.htm

Vancouver

Cheverst K, Clarke K, Cobb S, Hemmings T, Kember S, Mitchell K et al. Design with care. New Technology in the Human Services. 2001;14(1 & 2):39-47.

Author

Cheverst, Keith ; Clarke, Karen ; Cobb, Sue et al. / Design with care. In: New Technology in the Human Services. 2001 ; Vol. 14, No. 1 & 2. pp. 39-47.

Bibtex

@article{611278e56ced4126871fbd3bdd016f6a,
title = "Design with care",
abstract = "This paper is primarily about design and some of the difficulties of 'appropriate' design in care settings: about the interaction between technologies, application domains, design methodologies and about some of the challenges of informing design. This is hardly a novel concern, but this particular focus arises as a consequence of digital technologies maturing and transferring to the everyday domain; as the convergence of interactive digital systems, networks and mobile devices potentially transforms the ways that we carry out mundane, everyday activities. In recent years, the increasing presence of computing technology in the domestic environment has emerged as an important new arena of study. Domestic environments are becoming key sites for the consumption of information and communication technologies - embracing, in the 'care' domain, various forms of 'assistive' technologies and the design and provision of 'smart' homes. This paper reports on a recently initiated research project 'Care in the Digital Community' - begun under the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Dependability Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (DIRC) Network project EQUATOR. The project aims to use a multidisciplinary research team to facilitate the development of enabling technologies to assist care in the community for particular user groups with different support needs. The general objective is to examine how digital technology can be used to support sheltered housing residents and their staff. Although only recently started, the project anticipates exploring the affordances of a variety of technological configurations, including the use of virtual environments replicating real world situations, and the use of handheld and wearable digital technology to provide support.",
author = "Keith Cheverst and Karen Clarke and Sue Cobb and Terry Hemmings and S. Kember and Keith Mitchell and Peter Phillips and R. Procter and Tom Rodden and Mark Rouncefield",
year = "2001",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "39--47",
journal = "New Technology in the Human Services",
issn = "0959-0684",
number = "1 & 2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Design with care

AU - Cheverst, Keith

AU - Clarke, Karen

AU - Cobb, Sue

AU - Hemmings, Terry

AU - Kember, S.

AU - Mitchell, Keith

AU - Phillips, Peter

AU - Procter, R.

AU - Rodden, Tom

AU - Rouncefield, Mark

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - This paper is primarily about design and some of the difficulties of 'appropriate' design in care settings: about the interaction between technologies, application domains, design methodologies and about some of the challenges of informing design. This is hardly a novel concern, but this particular focus arises as a consequence of digital technologies maturing and transferring to the everyday domain; as the convergence of interactive digital systems, networks and mobile devices potentially transforms the ways that we carry out mundane, everyday activities. In recent years, the increasing presence of computing technology in the domestic environment has emerged as an important new arena of study. Domestic environments are becoming key sites for the consumption of information and communication technologies - embracing, in the 'care' domain, various forms of 'assistive' technologies and the design and provision of 'smart' homes. This paper reports on a recently initiated research project 'Care in the Digital Community' - begun under the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Dependability Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (DIRC) Network project EQUATOR. The project aims to use a multidisciplinary research team to facilitate the development of enabling technologies to assist care in the community for particular user groups with different support needs. The general objective is to examine how digital technology can be used to support sheltered housing residents and their staff. Although only recently started, the project anticipates exploring the affordances of a variety of technological configurations, including the use of virtual environments replicating real world situations, and the use of handheld and wearable digital technology to provide support.

AB - This paper is primarily about design and some of the difficulties of 'appropriate' design in care settings: about the interaction between technologies, application domains, design methodologies and about some of the challenges of informing design. This is hardly a novel concern, but this particular focus arises as a consequence of digital technologies maturing and transferring to the everyday domain; as the convergence of interactive digital systems, networks and mobile devices potentially transforms the ways that we carry out mundane, everyday activities. In recent years, the increasing presence of computing technology in the domestic environment has emerged as an important new arena of study. Domestic environments are becoming key sites for the consumption of information and communication technologies - embracing, in the 'care' domain, various forms of 'assistive' technologies and the design and provision of 'smart' homes. This paper reports on a recently initiated research project 'Care in the Digital Community' - begun under the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Dependability Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (DIRC) Network project EQUATOR. The project aims to use a multidisciplinary research team to facilitate the development of enabling technologies to assist care in the community for particular user groups with different support needs. The general objective is to examine how digital technology can be used to support sheltered housing residents and their staff. Although only recently started, the project anticipates exploring the affordances of a variety of technological configurations, including the use of virtual environments replicating real world situations, and the use of handheld and wearable digital technology to provide support.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

SP - 39

EP - 47

JO - New Technology in the Human Services

JF - New Technology in the Human Services

SN - 0959-0684

IS - 1 & 2

ER -