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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Design and Culture on 22/08/2022, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17547075.2022.2103957

    Accepted author manuscript, 330 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 22/02/24

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Designing With or Against Institutions?: Dilemmas of Participatory Design in Contested Cities

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>22/08/2022
<mark>Journal</mark>Design and Culture
Number of pages21
Publication StatusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date22/08/22
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

This article explores growing concerns behind the potential instrumentalization of participatory design within democratic institutions and city-making projects. Drawing on ethnographic data collected during a participatory urban redevelopment in Sydney, it analyzes the wider political, economic, and cultural dynamics shaping participatory design (PD) in contested urban spaces. As a result, the article reflects on the institutional frameworks that challenged the democratic claims of PD, analyzing three interdependent levels of institutional constraints: ideology, governance, and narratives. In doing so, the article interrogates the role of expert-led urban governance, of neoliberal ideologies, and the power/knowledge relations in the building of a consensus narrative. Finally, the article concludes by highlighting the contingency of the so-called constraints, exploring an alternative conceptualization of institutions as social relations. Following this approach, designers may challenge constraints and simultaneously work with, against, and beyond institutions.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Design and Culture on 22/08/2022, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17547075.2022.2103957